Study Abroad in Granada, Spain

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Study Abroad in Granada: Courses

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Recommended credits are shown in parentheses. Add/drop is permitted during the first 3 days of class. Please note that courses are subject to change at the discretion of the University of Granada.

INTENSIVE SPANISH LANGUAGE PROGRAM (SESSIONS 1, 2, 3 OR 4)

All students take a Spanish language course. Students (except Session 1) may also opt to take the 1.5-credit Conversation Practice course. A minimum enrollment of 10 students is required for this course to run.

Intermediate, Advanced and Superior level students can opt to take the Conversation Practice course or a 1.5 credit subject course (taught in Spanish) from the Spanish Language and Culture Program. When choosing electives please bear in mind that there may be scheduling conflicts.

Spanish Language Courses

Spanish 101 (5)  | Intensive Spanish Language–Beginner A1

This level is for students who have no previous knowledge of Spanish. During this course, students will be able to understand and express themselves in everyday situations and those related to the personal experiences of the learner, with basic language recourses. Students will be able to exchange simple and direct information. Included topics are: the present tense indicative or regular and irregular verbs, demonstrative and possessive adjectives, pronunciation and intonation, uses of “ser”, “estar” and “hay”, frequent reflexive verbs and definite and indefinite articles.

Spanish 102 (5) | Intensive Spanish Language–Elementary A2

Students who have studied Spanish only in high school, or 1 or 2 semester(s) in college generally place in this level. During this course, students will be able to understand and express themselves in everyday situations and those related to the personal experiences of the learner, with basic language recourses. Students will be able to exchange simple and direct information. Included topics are: forms and uses of the gerund, forms and uses of “gustar”, “encantar”, “interesar”, the differences between “ser” and “estar”, the preterit perfect tense, positive imperative and expressions of cause and excuse.

Spanish 103 (5) | Intensive Spanish Language–Pre-Intermediate A2+

A bridge level between the Elementary and Intermediate levels, this course concentrates on increasing students’ oral and written skills. Students who have studied 1 or 2 semesters in high school generally place in this level. Students will be able to ask for and give personal information, compare, express opinions, security and insecurity and judgments. Grammar topics include: demonstrative and possessive pronouns, direct and indirect object pronouns, the preterit, the imperative and the imperfect tenses.

Spanish 201 (5) | Intensive Spanish Language–Intermediate B1.1

Students who have studied Spanish throughout high school and continued with 1 or 2 semester(s) in college, or students who have 2 or 3 semesters in college, usually place in this level. During this course, students will be able to understand and express themselves in general situations that require the interchange of information and show personal attitudes about a multitude of familiar themes, not exclusively related to personal experience. Specific content includes: contrasting uses of the indefinite and the indicative perfect, morphology and uses of the indicative imperfect, “hace”, impersonal “se”, “parecerse”, and possessive adjectives and pronouns, making hypothesis.

Spanish 202 (5) | Intensive Spanish Language–Upper Intermediate B1.2

Students who have studied Spanish throughout high school and continued with 2 or 3 semesters in college, or students who have four semesters in college, usually place in this level. Focus is on communication skills and grammar. During this course, students will be able to understand and express themselves in general situations that require the interchange of information and show personal attitudes about a multitude of familiar themes, not exclusively related to personal experience. Specific content includes: morphology and uses of the future and conditional tenses, morphology and uses of the present subjunctive, giving advice, morphology and uses of the imperfect subjunctive.

Spanish 301 (5) | Intensive Spanish Language–Advanced B2.1

Students with at least 5 semesters of college Spanish, experience living in a Spanish-speaking country or Spanish study on a regular basis since elementary school usually place in this level. During this course, students will be able to understand and express themselves in multiple situations not necessarily familiar to them that will require exchanging information and personal opinions with complex linguistic structures. Specific content includes: uses of the imperfect, preterit, conditional, imperative and subjunctive, correlation of the tenses in specific communicative situations—arguments, debates, degrees of possibility, cause, consequence, etc., direct and indirect object pronouns, and the impersonal “se”.

Spanish 302 (5) | Intensive Spanish Language–Upper Advanced B2.2

Students with at least 5 semesters of college Spanish, experience living in a Spanish-speaking country or Spanish study on a regular basis since elementary school usually place in this level. During this course, students will be able to understand and express themselves in multiple situations not necessarily familiar to them that will require exchanging information and personal opinions with complex linguistic structures. Specific content includes: use of the subjunctive in forming opinions, values and attitudes, marginal uses of the imperfect: dreams, fiction, virtuosity, use of the compound conditional in the formulation of hypothesis, and phonetic characteristics of Spanish.

Spanish 401 (5) | Intensive Spanish Language–Superior C1.1

Students with at least 6 semesters of college Spanish place into this level. During this course, students will be able to understand and express themselves correctly and with fluidity in situations familiar to them and communicate adequately in situations that are not familiar to them through linguistically complex structures. Specific topics include: specific uses of the infinitive, gerund, participle, conditional and future tenses, particularities in the use of “ser” and “estar” and the passive voice. Cultural content includes themes such as: “20th-Century Spanish History”, “The Cultural legacy: Christian, Jews and Moors”, and “Gastronomy: The Mediterranean Diet”.

Spanish 402 (5) | Intensive Spanish Language–Proficiency C2

Bilingual students generally place into this level. During this course, students will be able to understand and express themselves correctly and with fluidity in situations familiar to them and communicate adequately in situations that are not familiar to them through linguistically complex structures. Specific topics include: prepositional patterns of verbs; problematic prepositions; proverbs and sayings; lexical adaptations on different socio-linguistic levels and varied conversational recourses. Cultural content includes themes such as: “The Family Structure”, “Principle Political, Cultural and Ideological Tendencies in Today’s Spain”, “Bullfighting” and “Flamenco”.

Spanish 110/210/310/410 (0.5) (1.5) | Conversation Practice  (Not available in Session 1)

Open to students at all levels. Students increase their communicative competence through intensive practice in speaking Spanish. Emphasis on pronunciation and vocabulary through discussion of contemporary topics such as newspapers, magazines, literary texts, songs and television commercials. 

SPANISH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE PROGRAM (SESSIONS 2, 3, 4 OR 2 + 4 COMBINED)

This program is offered to students with an Intermediate and above level of Spanish. You can take any combination of courses adding up to 6 credits. All classes are taught in Spanish.

3-Credit Spanish Language Courses

Spanish 203 (3) | Spanish Language Intermediate B1.1

Students who have studied Spanish throughout high school and continued with 1 or 2 semester(s) in college, or students who have 2 or 3 semesters in college, usually place in this level. During this course, students will be able to understand and express themselves in general situations that require the interchange of information and show personal attitudes about a multitude of familiar themes, not exclusively related to personal experience. Specific content includes: contrasting uses of the indefinite and the indicative perfect, morphology and uses of the indicative imperfect, “hace”, impersonal “se”, “parecerse”, and possessive adjectives and pronouns, making hypothesis. This course meets for 45 hours.

Spanish 204 (3) | Spanish Language Intermediate B1.2

Students who have studied Spanish throughout high school and continued with 2 or 3 semesters in college, or students who have 4 semesters in college, usually place in this level. Focus on communication skills and grammar. During this course, students will be able to understand and express themselves in general situations that require the interchange of information and show personal attitudes about a multitude of familiar themes, not exclusively related to personal experience. Specific content includes: morphology and uses of the future and conditional tenses, morphology and uses of the present subjunctive, giving advice, morphology and uses of the imperfect subjunctive. This course meets for 45 hours.

Spanish 303 (3) | Spanish Language Advanced B2.1

Students who have studied Spanish throughout high school and continued with 2 or 3 semesters in college, or students who have 4 semesters in college, usually place in this level. Focus on communication skills and grammar. During this course, students will be able to understand and express themselves in general situations that require the interchange of information and show personal attitudes about a multitude of familiar themes, not exclusively related to personal experience. Specific content includes: morphology and uses of the future and conditional tenses, morphology and uses of the present subjunctive, giving advice, morphology and uses of the imperfect subjunctive. This course meets for 45 hours.

Spanish 304 (3) | Spanish Language Advanced B2.2

A complete study of Spanish grammar for students at an Intermediate level. Tenses, constructions and usages. Regular and irregular verbs, imperatives, the indicative versus the subjunctive and active and passive constructions.

Spanish 403 (3) | Spanish Language Superior C1

Students with at least 5 semesters of college Spanish, experience living in a Spanishspeaking country or Spanish study on a regular basis since elementary school usually place in this level. During this course, students will be able to understand and express themselves in multiple situations not necessarily familiar to them that will require exchanging information and personal opinions with complex linguistic structures. Specific content includes: uses of the imperfect, preterit, conditional, imperative, and subjunctive, correlation of the tenses in specific communicative situations - arguments, debates, degrees of possibility, cause, consequence, etc., direct and indirect object pronouns, and the impersonal “se.” This course meets for 45 hours.

Spanish 404 (3) | Spanish Language Superior C2

Specific content includes: use of the subjunctive in forming opinions, values and attitudes, marginal uses of the imperfect: dreams, fiction, virtuosity, use of the compound conditional in the formulation of hypothesis and phonetic characteristics of Spanish.

3-Credit Subject Courses

Art/History 303 (3) | General History and History of Art in Spain

Follows the development of Spanish art from its Arabic origins to the present including Islamic, Visigothic, Mozarabic, Romanesque, Mudejar, Gothic, and the Renaissance and Baroque periods. Emphasis is placed on the Spanish masters: Velázquez, Goya, Picasso and Dalí. After a brief introduction to Spain’s history, this course covers aspects of contemporary history of Spain. It reviews the political, social and economic problems from 1900 to 1975: Alfonso XII, the Civil War, and the Franco regime. This course also covers the post-Franco transition to Democracy including the Constitution of 1978.

Geography/History 303 (3) | Geography and History of Spain

Topics include Spain’s climate and vegetation, the development of towns, and the current distribution of population, agriculture and industry, internal communications, foreign trade, tourism and the evolution of the Spanish economy. After a brief introduction to Spain’s history, this course covers aspects of contemporary history of Spain. It reviews the political, social and economic problems from 1900 to 1975: Alfonso XII, the Civil War, and the Franco regime. This course also covers the post-Franco transition to Democracy including the Constitution of 1978.

Law 303 (3) Sessions 2 and 3 only | The Legal System in Spain and the European Union and Spanish Business Law

This course addresses the essential institutions of the Spanish and European legal systems as a starting point to deepen the study of business law.

Literature 303 (3) | Spanish and Latin American Literature

Traces the major movements and principal authors of Spanish literature. Movements and periods studied include: Medieval romances, the Siglo de Oro, Romanticism, 20th century. Genres such as drama, poetry and novels are studied. Authors and works such as La Celestina, El Lazarillo de Tormes, Miguel de Cervantes’ Don Quijote, Lope de Vega, and García Lorca are studied. This course pursues literary trends of Latin American countries throughout the 20th century. Authors and portions of works such as Azuelo’s “Los de abajo”, Pablo Neruda, Jorge Luis Borge’s “Ficciones”, Isabel Allende and Laura Esquivel are studied.

Literature 304 (3) Sessions 2 and 3 only | Spanish Literature, Micro-narrative and the Modern Aesthetic

This course will work on the most important chapters of Spanish Literature from the middle of the nineteenth century to the present. There will be a historical and social approach that will help the student to contextualize the literary text. Texts and fundamental authors of that period will then be read and analyzed so that the theory is contextualized from the reading of the text. In addition, the course aims to be an approach to micro-reports, a narrative genre paradigm of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, from its origins to contemporary productions. Throughout the course, the different Spanish traditions will be investigated, from the formal and stylistic characteristics of the micro-relation through the analysis of the most representative texts of the genre.

Literature 305 (3) Sessions 2 and 3 only | Latin American Literature, Micro-narrative and the Modern Aesthetic

An overview of the history of Latin American literature from indigenous writers to the most contemporary writers. Some of the most representative works of the literature of these countries will be analyzed so that students get a clear introductory idea of Latin American literature. The text will be the basis from which the introductory theory of each topic will be contextualized. In addition, the course aims to be an approach to micro-reports, a narrative genre paradigm of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, from its origins to contemporary productions. Throughout the course, the different Latin American traditions will be investigated, from the formal and stylistic characteristics of the micro-relation through the analysis of the most representative texts of the genre.

Religion/Sociology 310 (3) | Spanish and Islamic Civilization and Culture

Discusses the importance and the effect of Islamic rule on Spain’s history, tradition, language, and culture. Topics include: the concept of Islam, the message of the Koran, Andalucía under Islamic rule, North African dynasties in Andalucía, the Nazari dynasty of Granada, cultural, literary, and artistic aspects of Islam, and Islamic architecture and symbols as exemplified by the Alhambra. Spanish civilization and contemporary society are examined through themes such as the relationships between professional, labor and cultural sectors, the aging of the population, gypsies, bullfighting, holidays, gastronomy and Flamenco. Audio-visuals, newspapers, magazines and texts are used. 

Sociology 311 (3) | Spanish and Latin American Civilization and Culture 

Spanish civilization and contemporary society are examined through themes such as the relationships between professional, labor and cultural sectors, the aging of the population, gypsies, bullfighting, holidays, gastronomy and Flamenco. Audio-visuals, newspapers, magazines and texts are used. Basic elements of Hispano-American culture are addressed to provide an understanding of its complexity. Topics include: the American geographic environment, racial distribution and historical evolution, demographics and problems of growth, family structure and daily life, social groups and their behavior, political tendencies, current ideologies, dependence, underdevelopment, external debt, art and folklore.

1.5-Credit Subject Courses

Art 301 (1.5) | History of Art in Spain

Follows the development of Spanish art from its Arabic origins to the present including Islamic, Visigothic, Mozarabic, Romanesque, Mudejar, Gothic, and the Renaissance and Baroque periods. Emphasis is placed on the Spanish masters: Velázquez, Goya, Picasso and Dalí.

Environmental Science 301 (1.5) | Renewable Energy

Focuses on developing theoretical and practical knowledge in the field of technology in the energy resources sector in general and in particular renewable technologies. The subject matter focuses on the application of different systems of renewable energy such as solar thermal, solar photovoltaic and biomass. The course will include laboratory work and practical sessions. 

Geography 301 (1.5) | Geography of Spain

Topics include Spain’s climate and vegetation, the development of towns, and the current distribution of population, agriculture and industry, internal communications, foreign trade, tourism and the evolution of the Spanish economy. 

History 301 (1.5) | History of Spain

After a brief introduction to Spain’s history, this course covers aspects of contemporary history of Spain. It reviews the political, social and economic problems from 1900 to 1975: Alfonso XII, the Civil War, and the Franco regime. This course also covers the post-Franco transition to Democracy including the Constitution of 1978. 

Law 301 (1.5) Session 2 only | Legal System in Spain and the European Union

This course addresses the essential institutions of the Spanish and European legal system as a starting point to deepen the study of law.

Law 302 (1.5) Session 2 only | Spanish Business Law

This course introduces Spanish business law to those interested in developing their understanding of economic activity in Spain, dealing with topics such as European law and the single market, competition and management, company tax law and banking law, among others.

Literature 301 (1.5) | Spanish Literature

Traces the major movements and principal authors of Spanish literature. Movements and periods studied include: Medieval romances, the Siglo de Oro, Romanticism, 20th century. Genres such as drama, poetry and novels are studied. Authors and works such as La Celestina, El Lazarillo de Tormes, Miguel de Cervantes’ Don Quijote, Lope de Vega, and García Lorca are studied. 

Literature 302 (1.5) | Latin American Literature

This course pursues literary trends of Latin American countries throughout the 20th century. Authors and portions of works such as Azuelo’s “Los de abajo”, Pablo Neruda, Jorge Luis Borge’s “Ficciones”, Isabel Allende and Laura Esquivel are studied.

Literature 303 (1.5) | ‘Flash Fiction’ and the Postmodern Aesthetic

The term ‘Microrrelato’ in Spanish refers to a style of fictional literature of extreme brevity known as ‘flash fiction.’ This course brings together forms of the genre from the 20th and 21st centuries from its origins through to contemporary production. Throughout the course we will investigate different Spanish and Latin American traditions investigating the formal characteristics and styles of ‘flash fiction’ through the analysis of texts most representative of the genre.

Spanish 315 (1.5) | The Diversity of Spanish in the World

Designed for students who already have a sufficient fluency in the Spanish language and who wish to become more expressive in the “everyday” language. Special attention is paid to vocabulary, the semantic differences of words in Spain and in Latin America, gestures, phrases, slang and sign language. Themes are practiced through oral discussion, written essays, and audio tapes transcribed by the students. 

Spanish 317/417 (1.5) | An Introduction to Business Spanish

Offers a realistic and lively approach to situations students might encounter in careers, especially if interested in improving their knowledge of the Spanish business world from a cross-cultural perspective. Students develop oral and written communication skills and pursue topics with materials used in business.

Spanish 318 (1.5) | Translation from English to Spanish

Current focus on language learning sees the activities of translation and interpretation as an instrument for the development of communicative competency and the skills of mediation. This course will familiarize students with the main techniques of translation concentrating on areas of contrastive analysis between Spanish and English which present the greatest challenge for the translator and offers a variety of texts for practice. 

Religion/Sociology 308 (1.5) | Islamic Culture in Spain

Discusses the importance and the effect of Islamic rule on Spain’s history, tradition, language, and culture. Topics include: the concept of Islam, the message of the Koran, Andalucía under Islamic rule, North African dynasties in Andalucía, the Nazari dynasty of Granada, cultural, literary, and artistic aspects of Islam, and Islamic architecture and symbols as exemplified by the Alhambra.

Sociology 306/406 (1.5) | Spanish Civilization and Culture 

Spanish civilization and contemporary society are examined through themes such as the relationships between professional, labor and cultural sectors, the aging of the population, gypsies, bullfighting, holidays, gastronomy and Flamenco. Audio-visuals, newspapers, magazines and texts are used. 

Sociology 309 (1.5) | Latin American Civilization and Culture

Basic elements of Hispano-American culture are addressed to provide an understanding of its complexity. Topics include: the American geographic environment, racial distribution and historical evolution, demographics and problems of growth, family structure and daily life, social groups and their behavior, political tendencies, current ideologies, dependence, underdevelopment, external debt, art and folklore. 

Internship Program: Business, Medical and NGO

The internship program gives students with an Intermediate level of Spanish and above the opportunity to intern in a local business, in a local hospital or with an NGO. Students combine the internship course with courses from the Spanish Language and Culture program for up to 6.5 credits per session. Students complete an internship application in addition to the program application. Spanish level is determined by a placement test regardless of previous experience. We advise you to gain prior approval for several course options in order to ensure you will receive credit in the event that you do not place into the required level of Spanish for the internship.

Internship 301 (3): Business Internship

Available in Sessions 2 and 4 or Sessions 2 + 4 Combined. This course is available to students with an Upper Advanced level of Spanish who place into Spanish 304/403/404 Upper Advanced B2.2 level or above. Most internships are based in hotels in Granada. Working alongside professionals in the tourism and hospitality industry students will receive hands on experience and insight into business practice in Spain.

Internship 302 (3): Medical Internship

Available in Sessions 2 and 4 or Sessions 2 + 4 Combined. Students undertaking the medical internship will work in a private hospital shadowing and working with healthcare professionals. Students must place into Spanish 304/403/404 Upper Advanced B2.2 level or above and be studying relevant (major or minor) health courses as part of their degree program.

Internship 303 (1.5): NGO

This internship is available in Session 2 only. Students will intern with Solidarios por el Desarrollo, a local organization which undertakes activities and projects to support families and homeless people, the integration of immigrants into society, and provide mental health support. Students wishing to intern in an NGO must place into Spanish 203, Intermediate B1.1 level or above.

The Internship Program enables students to:

  • apply academic training to practical situations in business, the medical field and non-governmental organizations (NGOs)
  • work alongside professionals and managers to observe different work-styles and techniques
  • relate work experience to classroom situations
  • enrich their employment opportunities and establish a work record for their CV (résumé)
  • acquire skills and strengths essential to the development of personal confidence
  • gain contacts and insight into a career area

The ideal internship placement is a coordination between the skills and personality that an organization is seeking and those which a student presents. Placements are made with both small and large organizations, and selection is based on a number of criteria.

Students must attend interviews with suitable organizations as part of the internship selection process. Final selection is always at the discretion of the organization and the University of Granada Internship Coordinator.


Download PDF with full program details on all AIFS Spain programs!

Download PDF with full program details on all AIFS Spain, Granada programs!