AIFS Abroad

AIFS Study Abroad in St. Petersburg, Russia
Fall Semester 2010 and Spring Semester 2011
Course Descriptions

   

Students are required to take one Russian language course at the appropriate level and one or more of the following courses. There is a maximum of 10 students per language class, while a minimum of 10 students is required to confirm a non-language course.

Recommended semester credits are given in parentheses. Each semester covers one language level. Full-year students in good standing move to the next level the second semester.

Scheduling conflicts may arise. The University Dean and Resident Director reserve the right to cancel or modify courses in unavoidable circumstances or for insufficient enrollment (less than 10 students).

Russian Language Courses
Course Code and Credits: Russian 101 fall/spring (9)
Course Title: Elementary I
Course Description:
Beginning college level course in Russian grammar, conversation, phonetics and writing practice.
Course Code and Credits: Russian 102 fall/spring (9)
Course Title: Elementary II
Course Description:
Beginning college level course in Russian grammar, conversation, phonetics and writing practice.
Course Code and Credits: Russian 201 fall/spring (9)
Course Title: Intermediate I
Course Description:
Vocabulary, grammar, composition, phonetics and techniques of written expression with further development of vocabulary and pronunciation.
Course Code and Credits: Russian 202 fall/spring (9)
Course Title: Intermediate II
Course Description:
Vocabulary, grammar, composition, phonetics and techniques of written expression with further development of vocabulary and pronunciation.
Course Code and Credits: Russian 203 fall/spring (9)
Course Title: Intermediate III
Course Description:
Vocabulary, grammar, composition, phonetics and techniques of written expression with further development of vocabulary and pronunciation.
Course Code and Credits: Russian 301 fall/spring (9)
Course Title: Advanced I
Course Description:
Structural exercises in grammar, use of different categories of language (commercial, administrative, journalistic, familiar, colloquial, formal) and extensive written work.
Course Code and Credits: Russian 302 fall/spring (9)
Course Title: Advanced II
Course Description:
Structural exercises in grammar, use of different categories of language (commercial, administrative, journalistic, familiar, colloquial, formal) and extensive written work.
Course Code and Credits: Russian 401 fall/spring (9)
Course Title: Superior I
Course Description:
Perfecting techniques already learned and acquiring more sophisticated written and spoken styles.
Course Code and Credits: Russian 402 fall/spring (9)
Course Title: Superior II
Course Description:
Perfecting techniques already learned and acquiring more sophisticated written and spoken styles.

Elective Classes taught in English

These courses meet throughout the semester (total of 42 hours for the semester).
Elective Classes taught in English
Course Code and Credits: Art History 303 fall/spring (3)
Course Title: History of Russian Art
Course Description:
Works of the most famous painters of icons and of the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries. Many of the works discussed are visited in local museums such as the Hermitage and the Russian Museum.
Course Code and Credits: History 305 fall/spring (3)
Course Title: Russian History from Kievan Rus to the Revolution
Course Description:
The founding and expansion of the Russian state from Kievan Rus through czarist Russia to the eve of the revolution. Students visit sites in St. Petersburg where major events of Russian history took place.
Course Code and Credits: History/Political Science 315 fall/spring (3)
Course Title: Contemporary History of Russia: The Communist Phase
Course Description:
Russia’s recent historical background from the October Revolution to the collapse of the USSR. The seizure of Russia by the Bolsheviks in October 1917 through the Civil War (1918-1922), Stalin’s role and that of his Communist followers. Problems of reforms under Communist domination (N.S. Khrushchev, M.S. Gorbachev), the mellowing of the Communist dictatorship, growing corruption of elites and the final demise of Communist dictatorship.
Course Code and Credits: History 312 fall/spring (3)
Course Title: History and Culture of St. Petersburg: St. Petersburg’s Role in Russian History and Culture
Course Description:
Topics include St. Petersburg as the capital of the Russian Empire and home to major architectural and artistic monuments, the city as home to Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Brodsky and Shostokovitch. This course also looks at major figures in Russian history and their links to St. Petersburg.
Course Code and Credits: Literature 307 fall/spring (3)
Course Title: 19th Century Russian Literature
Course Description:
Reading key works in translation, students trace the history of classical Russian literature from 11th century beginnings to the turn of the 20th century. Main focus is on 19th century writers such as Pushkin, Tolstoi, Dostoevsky, Gogol and Chekhov.
Course Code and Credits: Literature 309 fall/spring (3)
Course Title: Contemporary Russian Literature
Course Description:
Focus is on major themes of Russian literature since 1917, with students reading (in translation) highly regarded works written both in Russia and abroad.
Course Code and Credits: Political Science/Sociology 311 fall/spring (3)
Course Title: Contemporary Russian Life
Course Description:
Major elements of contemporary Russian life: law, economics, government, health care, art and education. Topics include Soviet literature and journalism, the “non-Russian nationality” question since 1985 and economic effects of Perestroika.
Course Code and Credits: Religion/Sociology 319 fall/spring (3)
Course Title: The Russian Orthodox Church, its Development and its Influence Today
Course Description:
Development of the Russian Orthodox Church and the influence that the Orthodoxy has on Russian culture. Relationship and interaction between the Church and State during different periods of Russian history. The major religious confessions existing in Russia and the role and influence that the Orthodox Church has in Russian society today.

Courses taught in Russian

Advanced-level students may enroll in certain elective classes in Russian which are offered to Russian students. Students who believe they would test into the advanced level may contact the Resident Director by email at the time of application to discuss elective options during their semester in St Petersburg. Electives in Russian cannot be guaranteed by the University unless enough students enroll from the larger Russian speaking University community.