AIFS Abroad

AIFS Study Abroad in Wellington, New Zealand
Fall Semester 2010 and Spring Semester 2011
Course Descriptions

   

The following is a sample list of available courses and is subject to change. An updated list of all courses available for June - November and February - June is available from the AIFS Admissions Officer. This will also include course descriptions and prerequisites. Students must make sure they have met all prerequisites for a course.

Victoria University course numbers are listed first with the American equivalent - one level higher - after. Recommended semester credits are in parentheses.

June-November Courses
Course Code and Credits: ARTH 213/Art History 313 (4)
Course Title: Art in Aotearoa New Zealand
Course Description:
A chronological survey of the art of Aotearoa New Zealand from the 1760s to the present.
Course Code and Credits: ECON 205/Economics 315 (4)
Course Title: The Development of the Modern International Economy
Course Description:
An outline of international economic history from about 1850 to the present day. The central concern is with the history of the international monetary system, international trade, and international capital flows. Attention is also given to international migration, the politics of international economic relations, and the record of modern economic growth.
Course Code and Credits: ENGL 244/English 344 (4)
Course Title: Children’s Literature: A Selected Genre
Course Description:
The course introduces the study of children’s literature through a substantial selection of texts in a single genre by a range of recognized authors - normally including a New Zealand writer.
Course Code and Credits: ENVI 214/Environmental Studies 314 (4)
Course Title: Environment and Resources: New Zealand Perspectives
Course Description:
Principles and issues in resource management and human interaction with the biophysical environment. The course focuses on environmental and resource management issues which are of particular concern in contemporary New Zealand.
Course Code and Credits: ESCI 132/Earth Sciences 232 (4)
Course Title: Antarctica – Unfreezing the Continent
Course Description:
A broad introduction to Antarctica, including its history, exploration, weather, geology, fauna and management. Its role in the global climate system is emphasized.
Course Code and Credits: FILM 237/Film Studies 337 (4)
Course Title: Cinema of Aotearoa New Zealand
Course Description:
A study of the cinema of Aotearoa New Zealand from cultural, historical, and economic perspectives, with some consideration of the relation between film and television in this country.
Course Code and Credits: HIST 112/History 212 (4)
Course Title: Introduction to New Zealand History
Course Description:
This course explores the development of distinctive patterns of life in 20th century Aotearoa New Zealand. Examining history and historiography, issues of biculturalism, gender, class and evolving relations with Australia, Britain, the USA, the Pacific and Asia are considered within a broad survey of the period, c. 1900-2007.
Course Code and Credits: HIST 219/History 319 (4)
Course Title: Pacific History
Course Description:
This course provides an introduction to the history of the peoples of the Pacific Islands from their initial settlement of the region to the present day. Beginning with Pacific Islanders’ colonisation of the region, the course then charts Pacific Islanders’ progressive involvement in the emerging global economy following sustained European contact and involvement with the region.
Course Code and Credits: MAOR 123/Maori Studies 223 (4)
Course Title: Maori Society and Culture
Course Description:
This course introduces students to a broad range of Maori beliefs, concepts and structures that are important to the foundations and development of Maori society and culture. The course will cover aspects of pre-European Maori society, cultural change, present-day developments as well as visions for the future.
Course Code and Credits: PHIL 262/Philosophy 362 (4)
Course Title: Moral and Political Philosophy
Course Description:
This course examines some of the leading schools of contemporary political and moral philosophy, including liberalism, libertarianism, socialism, communitarianism and feminism. Some of the philosophers we read include John Rawls, Robert Nozick, Michael Sandel, Robert Paul Wolff and Iris Marion Young. Although the focus of the course is on contemporary thought, we may also look briefly at some historical antecedents to these thinkers.
Course Code and Credits: POLS 203/Political Science 303 (4)
Course Title: East Asian Politics
Course Description:
This course introduces students to politics and government in East Asia. It focuses on China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan, and examines the political history and culture, major institutions and policy processes, economic and social development, and foreign policies of these countries.
Course Code and Credits: POLS 206/Political Science 306 (4)
Course Title: New Zealand Politics: Power, Equality and Diversity
Course Description:
The primary focus is analyzing and reviewing New Zealand’s constitutional arrangements. By the end of the course, students should have a thorough understanding of (i) the key structures in the New Zealand political system; (ii) the principal sources of power, equality and diversity in New Zealand; and (iii) the contents of - including the facts and the arguments in - the course set text.
Course Code and Credits: RELI 212/Religious Studies 312 (4)
Course Title: Religions, Culture and Politics in Aotearoa New Zealand and the Pacific
Course Description:
The study of religious traditions in New Zealand and in the Islands of the Pacific and the influence of these religions on the development of culture, politics, and society in the region.
Course Code and Credits: THEA 208/Theater 308 (4)
Course Title: Shakespeare
Course Description:
A study of five plays, both as literary texts and as scripts for performance on stage and screen. The course focuses particularly on ‘the idea of the play’: Shakespeare’s experiments with dramatic form and his changing sense of the relationship between theatrical illusion and reality.

February-June Courses
Course Code and Credits: ENGL 232/English 332 (4)
Course Title: Theatrical Revolution: Drama from Realism to the Postmodern
Course Description:
A study of modern drama and theater from the development of realism in the late 19th century up to contemporary plays, playwrights and production. Dramatists studied will normally include the formative Europeans Ibsen, Chekhov and Brecht (read in translation), as well as Beckett, Churchill and a contemporary New Zealand playwright.
Course Code and Credits: ENGL 234/English 334 (4)
Course Title: New Zealand Literature
Course Description:
A thematic study of New Zealand poetry, the novel and the short story in three modules
Course Code and Credits: ENVI 222/Environmental Studies 322 (4)
Course Title: Ecology and Environment
Course Description:
An introduction to the principles of Ecology and Environmental Science, including a required week-long field trip during the Easter vacation. The course will focus on physical and biological processes in terrestrial environments and ecosystem functioning. The field trip will introduce techniques relevant to field-based enquiry in ecological and environmental science.
Course Code and Credits: FILM 231/Film Studies 331 (4)
Course Title: History and Criticism of Film
Course Description:
A survey of film history and the principles underlying historical and critical approaches to the cinema.
Course Code and Credits: INTP 244/International Relations 344 (4)
Course Title: New Zealand in the World
Course Description:
This course examines New Zealand as an actor in world politics. It provides an introductory survey of New Zealand’s external relations and their main domestic and international determinants. The material covers foreign and defense policy and also examines New Zealand’s role in institutions such as the United Nations. The subject pays particular attention to New Zealand’s changing relationships with Asia, the United States and Britain. Where appropriate, the class will utilize relevant expertise from organizations such as MFAT, Defence and the NZDF to provide ‘real world’ examples of New Zealand’s foreign and security policy in practice.
Course Code and Credits: MAOR 122/Maori Studies 222 (4)
Course Title: The Peopling of Polynesia
Course Description:
This course focuses on Polynesian origins in the Pacific with special emphasis on the settlement of New Zealand, and the development of Maori culture in New Zealand. This course focuses on archaeological, traditional and other evidence.
Course Code and Credits: PASI 101/Pacific Studies 201 (4)
Course Title: The Pacific Heritage
Course Description:
This is a survey course on a range of Pacific nations, covering socio-cultural, geographical, economic, and historical issues including indigenous perspectives.
Course Code and Credits: POLS 208/Political Science 308 (4)
Course Title: Political Change in the Southeast Pacific
Course Description:
This course will examine constitutional issues and broader political change in a number of Southeast Asian states. Students have the opportunity to gain a better understanding of political institutions and wider political trends in countries with very diverse systems of government, including Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Burma, Thailand, Singapore, Malaysia and Brunei.
Course Code and Credits: POLS 218/Political Science 318 (4)
Course Title: Politics and the Media in New Zealand
Course Description:
This course focuses on the political roles, functions and effects of the media in New Zealand. Topics studied will include: media and elections (including voting behavior); news management and production; the role of public relations in political lobbying and electioneering; the political uses of opinion polls and experts; the regulatory environment within which the media operates; ownership and control of the media, public service broadcasting; Maori politics and the media; and the media and political leadership.
Course Code and Credits: PSYC 231/Psychology 331 (4)
Course Title: Cognitive Psychology
Course Description:
This course provides a foundation on the underpinnings of human cognition. Topics may include: perception, attention, memory, language, thinking, reasoning and decision making.
Course Code and Credits: SOSC 218/Sociology 318 (4)
Course Title: Globalization and its Discontents
Course Description:
This course explores a range of issues around growing world interconnectedness. It examines cultural, political, and economic aspects of globalization; considers a number of major theoretical approaches to globalization; looks at the anti-globalization movement; and focuses on a range of pressing global questions including terrorism, human rights, the environment and global cities.
Course Code and Credits: THEA 201/Theater 301 (4)
Course Title: Theatrical Revolution: Drama from Realism to the Postmodern
Course Description:
A study of modern drama and theater from the development of realism in the late 19th century up to contemporary plays, playwrights and production. Dramatists studied normally include the formative Europeans Ibsen, Chekhov and Brecht (read in translation), as well as Beckett, Kushner and a contemporary New Zealand playwright.

For a complete list of courses available during the June-November and February-June semester, please contact the AIFS Admissions Officer or visit Victoria University of Wellington’s online course catalogue: http://www.victoria.ac.nz/home/study/subjects/coursecatalogue.aspx. This website also includes course descriptions and prerequisites for all courses. Vicotria University of Wellington runs on a trimester-based system. It is important to keep in mind that the June-November semester is considered Trimester two and February-June semester is Trimester one.