Study Abroad in Rome, Italy

Study Abroad in Rome: Courses

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Italian language course levels are determined by placement tests to ensure the appropriate level. Since language demands are challenging, students may be placed in a level lower than requested. Students are advised to gain pre-approval for several levels of Italian from their home institution in order to ensure that they receive credit for the level they are placed into after the placement test. A minimum enrollment of 10 is required to confirm a course. Semester credits are shown in parentheses. Please note that not all courses listed will run, in order for a course to be offered there must be enough interest generated from the preliminary course forms.

Courses may change and new courses may be available.

Online Registration - Very Important!

Students must register for all classes online at: www.richmondinrome.it.

Registration week is: June 4-11, 2018 (fall semester), November 5 - 12, 2018 (spring semester)

Traditional Academic Program

With the exception of Italian (2-credit Orientation course required), courses are taught in English, Monday through Thursday plus some Fridays. New courses may be offered.

Italian Language

All students take the 2-credit Italian Language during Orientation.

CEFR (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages) level is indicated along with course code.

Orientation language courses (required for all students)

ITL 3821 – A1 (2) | Elementary Italian I

A basic introduction to the Italian language for those with no previous experience, the course teaches essential vocabulary and grammar and develops students’ ability to communicate in an authentic linguistic context.

ITL 3822 – A2 (2) | Elementary Italian II

Designed for students who already have some knowledge of Italian, the course revises basic grammar and vocabulary in preparation for the next, Intermediate, level. Classes and student oral practice are conducted mainly in Italian. Prerequisites: One or two semesters of Italian and/or a pass at ITL 3821 level, and/or min. 70/100 score on the diagnostic test.

ITL 4821 – B1 (2) | Intermediate Italian I

This course helps students to develop their ability to communicate effectively, using an expanded range of vocabulary. Conversation practice improves listening and interpretation skills. Reading and writing exercises improve skills in understanding and writing simple prose. Prerequisites: Two or three semesters of Italian and/or a pass at ITL 3822 level, and/or min. 70/100 score on the diagnostic test.

ITL 4822 – B2 (2) | Intermediate Italian II

This course develops students’ skills and enables them to understand and respond to quite complex lines of argument, both in oral and in written form. Students are introduced to more complex forms of grammar and more expanded vocabulary, to give them the ability to carry out and refine tasks within authentic context. Prerequisites: Three or four semesters of Italian and/or a pass at ITL 4821 level.

ITL 3810 – A1 (1) | Basic Spoken Italian

This 10-week course provides students with basic vocabulary and phrases to cope with authentic everyday situations. It is designed for those students who prefer the communicative approach with less emphasis on language structure analysis.

ITL 3842 – A2 (4) | Elementary Italian II

Designed for students who already have some knowledge of Italian, the course revises basic grammar and vocabulary before progressing to more complex structures and functions leading up to the next, Intermediate, level. Conversation is a central part of every lesson, with ample opportunity for student oral practice in understanding the spoken language through the use of authentic material. Classes are conducted mainly in Italian. Prerequisites: One or two semesters of Italian and/or a pass at ITL 3821 level, and/or min. 70/100 score on the diagnostic test.

ITL 4841 – B1 (4) | Intermediate Italian I

This course helps students to develop their ability to communicate effectively and accurately, using an expanded range of vocabulary. Conversation practice improves listening and interpretation skills for better understanding and response in authentic Italian context, such as talking about cultural elements in Italian society and expressing opinions. Reading and writing exercises improve skills in understanding prose and writing letters and messages with appropriate vocabulary. Prerequisites: Two or three semesters of Italian and/or a pass at 3822 level.

ITL 4842 – B2 (4) | Intermediate Italian II

This course builds upon the skills gained in Intermediate level and develops them to enable students to understand and respond to quite complex lines of argument, both in oral and in written form. Students review complex grammar structures and practice exercises in reading, composition, phonetics, syntax, and style. Continued practice in conversation provides students with an increased capability to communicate competently in Italian. Prerequisites: Three or four semesters of Italian and/or a pass at 4841 level.

ITL 5830 – B2 – C1 (3) | Advanced Italian

This course introduces students to advanced structures and vocabulary, which will enable them to interact with the Italian world at a sophisticated level. It enables them to understand lectures and complex lines of argument, including various attitudes and viewpoints, both in oral and in written form. They should become fluent and spontaneous in verbal interaction, and well able to present and sustain an argument, both orally and in evidencebased writing Prerequisites: Four/five semesters of Italian and/or a pass at ITL 4842 level.

Courses Taught in English

Please see the Richmond website for the latest descriptions and prerequisites.

Communications, Arts, Social Sciences

ADM 5875 (3) | Sketchbook of Rome

Drawing is used as a basic exploratory tool to examine Rome as the site for both subject—in particular, the river Tevere—and as a research resource for the practice of drawing—especially in the Roman churches, galleries and museums. The course is divided between working in the studio and on location in Rome. The sketchbook is an essential aspect of the course in helping students to document the city, stimulate and develop ideas and as a reminder that drawing is a portable medium. A studio fee is levied on this course.

ADM 5860 (3) | Photography for the Media

Recommended for Communications and Journalism majors as well as photographers, this course develops knowledge and experience in photojournalism via the study of the work of major practitioners and the production of assignments typical of today’s photojournalists. Students will need to provide a DSLR (digital reflex) camera and a laptop (with any basic photo editing software). There is a studio fee for this course.

AVC 4800 (1) | Introduction to Italian Art

Examines developments in early Italian painting and sculpture leading up to the Renaissance and Baroque. Students analyze Italian art in its historical context, particularly in terms of patronage and the key social, religious and philosophical events. It is taught during field study visits, which include Florence, Pompeii, Naples and Capri. A field project paper is required.

AVC 5810 (3) | Renaissance and Baroque Art in Rome

Examines the development of painting, sculpture and architecture in Renaissance and Baroque Italy through the works of Michelangelo, Raphael, Caravaggio and Bernini. Students examine key works, consider the historical and cultural context in which the art was produced and consumed. The course focuses on Rome and includes on-site visits.

AVC 5840 (3) | Art and Culture in Rome: 800 BC - 2000 AD

Examines the history and society of Rome and its architectural and artistic expression as it developed over a period of 3,000 years. Students study key examples of architecture, monuments and art from Classical Rome through to the Renaissance and Baroque, and the modern period. Much of the course is taught on-site with visits to churches, palaces and museums.

COM 5845 (3) | Luxury Fashion in Rome

Traces the multiple connections between the fashion and media industries. The course focus is on retail and visual merchandising. Students are involved in The Luxury Shopping Experience project to experience the way people consume luxury in Rome. Following clear, prearranged guidelines, they visit, examine, and report on selected fashion stores located along Via Condotti and Via Borgognona in Rome.

COM 5855 (3) | Writing for the Media/Journalism in Italy

In this course, students explore the most important characteristics of Italian journalism and the Italian media system. The focus is around a comparative analysis of different styles used in international journalism. Particular attention is given to the development of writing styles for news, features, interviews and reviews where students develop their own practical skills.

FLM 5800 (3) | History of Italian Cinema and Society

Explores the history of Italian cinema and society as represented in film, with particular focus on the wide range of films to emerge after the Second World War. Students study Italian cinema within the context of world cinema to assess realism as an aesthetic convention as well as gain insight into Italian culture and ways of thinking.

HST 5805 (3) | Rome through the Ages

Covers the history of Rome from its reputed founding by Romulus and Remus to the establishment of the Roman Republic and the creation of the Roman Empire, leading up to conversion to Christianity and the appointment of the first Christian emperor. Much of the course is taught on-site with visits to archaeological sites, churches and museums.

HST 5815 (3) | History of Food and Table Manners

Explores food and food habits in human history from early civilization to the Modern period, via the Classical world and the Middle Ages. Themes such as the social function of banquets, dietary rules, food models, cultural identity and table manners are considered. The course includes on-site with visits to local food markets and museums.

HST 5820 (3) | History of the Italian Mafia

This course explores the history of the Italian Mafia from the national unification of Italy until the present day. Topics studied include relationships within the organization, those between the Mafia and Italian Politics and those between the Italian and the American mafia.

HST 5XXX (3) course code to be confirmed | Western Medicine: from Antiquity to the Scientific Revolution

This course surveys the history of medical knowledge and practice in Western Europe from Antiquity to the 19th century. In particular, it examines the development and dissemination of medical knowledge, the organization of healthcare, the experiences of patients, and the relationship between forms of healing and their social and cultural contexts.

INR 5800 (3) | Globalization: A European Perspective

This interdisciplinary course addresses the important and complex phenomenon of contemporary globalization. The political, social, economic and cultural aspects are addressed from a specifically European perspective.

INR 5810 (3) | Security Studies

This course examines enduring and contemporary questions of security and insecurity in the international system. The course will feature the participation of Italian Carabinieri Police/Army Force, including anti-terrorist and special security units. Specific areas will be covered with the approach of “experience education”.

ISL 5800 (3) | Service Learning and Active Citizenship

The Service Learning and Active Citizenship course is a student community placement that aims to provide students from all disciplines and majors with the intellectual, professional and personal skills that will enable them to function well in a culturally diverse community in Rome. In addition to the weeks of field work, the student will also produce a written journal of their experience which provides critical reflection) a ‘community action’ portfolio and a final oral presentation.

LIT 5815 (3) | Roman Life and Thought

Explores the most important literary works of classical antiquity in translation. Students will familiarize themselves with different literary genres and explore the basis of European literary culture. Site visits to the Ara Pacis, Crypta Balbi and to the National Museum of Palazzo Massimo complement classroom lectures.

PHL 5800 (3) | Classical Mythology

This interdisciplinary course explores the classical myths from Greek and Latin literature and considers their historical and cultural contexts. Students will read passages in translation from major Greek and Roman authors and analyze the use of mythology in classical literature and how it has changed through the ages. Visits to museums and archaeological sites are included in the course.

PLT 5810 (3) | The European Union in the New International System

Covers the history of the European Union, from its foundation in the fifties until the present. It will look at the different institutions inside the European Union and their role in the process of enlarging the Union and moving towards greater integration. Other policies of the member states will also be covered, including agricultural, regional, social, environmental and energy policies.

PSY 5XXX (3) course code to be confirmed | Cross-Cultural Psychology

This course provides a multicultural and global perspective psychology. Students analyze how culture influences human thoughts and behavior across cultures by integrating theoretical and applied components of cross-cultural psychology with theory and research from anthropology, sociology, biology, geography, communications and intercultural relations.

RLG 5800 (3) | Religions and Cults of the Roman Empire

Focuses on the religious experience of Late Antiquity, which opened the way to medieval civilization and, eventually, to modern western culture. It examines the beliefs present within the Roman Empire (I – IV century A.D.), including the most significant religions, cults and mystical movements. Visits to museums and places of archaeological importance in Rome will illustrate the connection between the material and the religious.

RLG 5810 (3) | Comparative World Religions

Explores the monotheistic religions of the Near East (Judaism, Christianity and Islam), those of India and the Far East (Hinduism, Buddhism, and Taoism) and the ‘new-age’ faiths. The 322 | Scholarships available. Special emphasis is laid on the philosophical and psychological basis of each religion and on common themes.

RLG 5XXX (3) course code to be confirmed | The Popes of Rome: History of the Catholic Church

This course studies the major events, ideas, persons, and places that have significantly influenced both the evolution of the Church from its primitive beginnings as a religious sect, spiritual and political movement in the Mediterranean to the establishment of the current sovereign Vatican City State in Rome, as well as the progression of human civilization within the same historical period.

SCL 5855 (3) | Culture and Style in Italy

The course focuses on aspects of post-war Italian culture including cuisine, fashion, religious beliefs and the persistence of superstition. Lectures cover topics such as the role of women, food and wine as cultural traditions, the effect of social change, and culture and style. Lectures are supported by field visits, food and wine tasting sessions, and audio-visual materials.

SCL 5860 (3) | Made in Italy: Symbols of Italian Identity from Espresso to Ferrari

This course explores the history and practices of consumption in Italy, and the consumption of goods, products and services that have been encoded as “Italian” outside the country itself. The course looks at the transition to a consumer society and investigates areas such as advertising, fashion, industrial design, food culture and sport. The course includes on-site visits and field trips to major Italian companies.

Business

ECN 5805 (3) | International Economic Relations

Introduces students to international economic relations. These relations are relations of international trade, international production and finance as well as international development. The course is taught within the context of technology, politics and culture.

MGT 5850 (3) | Project Management for the Arts and Culture

This course introduces students to the concepts of project management relevant to the cultural industry. The theoretical basis will be applied to the industry of arts and culture. The course focuses on case studies that are related to Rome’s Cultural Heritage. Students will acquire knowledge, skills and competencies to understand the fundamental tenets of project management. The skills learned may also be applied to different international contexts.

MGT 5XXX (3) course code to be confirmed | Principles of Management

The course investigates the theories, structures and trends of management in organizations. The course covers topics such as the analysis of organizational environments, problem identification, opportunity analysis, decision making under uncertainty and the managerial functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling. The course also addresses issues of sustainability.

MKT 5800 (3) | Principles of Marketing

Introduces students to the principles and operations of marketing. Course work includes an in-depth analysis of the strategic role marketing plays in contemporary business from new product development, marketing research and target marketing to consumer behavior analysis, advertising and promotion and personal selling activities. Lectures, discussion topics, case studies, videos and practical exercises are used to cover the course material.

MKT 5XXX (3) course code to be confirmed | International Marketing

The course investigates the problems of entering new markets and competing in markets with different cultures. Studies the methods of analyzing market demand, competition, costs, the structure of distribution and other factors which affect marketing management decisions in foreign countries.

Italian Language and Culture Certificate Program

The Italian Language and Culture Certificate Program is available to all students from absolute beginners to Intermediate I level. Students enrolled in the Italian Certificate Program are strongly encouraged to choose the Italian family homestay accommodation option. Native speakers are not eligible for a certificate in their own language.

Program at a Glance

Students take one 3-credit course plus three 4-credit courses taught progressively throughout the semester for a total of 15 credits. An examination is administered at the end of each course which students must pass in order to be admitted to the upper level continuation.

The program is taught in conjunction with Scuola Leonardo da Vinci. Classes meet every day, Monday through Friday, for a total of 18 contact hours weekly.

Course Options
Students earn a certificate by:

  • completing four courses from those offered to learners of Italian at six different levels of proficiency, from Beginner to Advanced (i.e., Elementary I and II and Intermediate I and II) with a minimum grade of B;
  • demonstrating intermediate - high level proficiency in a written and oral proficiency interview administered at the end of the program by a certified tester approved by the Richmond University Department of Modern Languages.

The Common European Framework (CEFR) divides learners into six different levels.

For each level there is a description of what the learner has to be able to do in reading, listening, speaking and writing. Those descriptions apply to any language.

A-Basic Speaker

  • A1 Beginner
  • A2 Elementary

In Levels A1/A2 students take courses which provide the basics of Italian in grammar, reading, writing, and speaking/listening. These courses improve Italian communication skills.

B-Independent Speaker

  • B1 Pre-intermediate/Intermediate
  • B2 Intermediate/Upper intermediate

In Levels B1/B2 students take courses designed to develop the linguistic and study skills in reading academic texts, listening to academic lectures and other types of communication, writing clear academic papers and professional communication, participating effectively in class discussions and making presentations.

C Proficient Speaker

  • C1 Advanced
  • C2 Proficiency

In Levels C1/C2 High Intermediate to Advanced students take courses focused on a particular skill or topic. C2 courses include test preparation classes for CILS, the Certification of Italian as a Foreign Language (Certificazione di Italiano come Lingua Straniera) or CELI, the Certificate of Knowledge of Italian Language (Certificato di Conoscenza della Lingua Italiana). CILS and CELI are internationally recognized official qualifications of the Italian language for foreigners offered by the Italian University for Foreigners in Perugia and Siena.

Beginners start with an Elementary Italian I – A1, and may progress up to the Intermediate I plus/B1+ level.

Students with previous study of the Italian language take an entrance test, written and oral, to determine appropriate initial placement and subsequent levels:
Elementary Italian II – A2, and may progress up to the Intermediate 2 plus/B2+ level.
Intermediate Italian I – B1, and may progress up to the Advanced/ C1+ level.
Intermediate Italian II – B2, and may progress up to the Proficiency/C2 level.
CEFR (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages) level is indicated along with course code.

Italian Language and Culture Certificate Program

ITL 3831 – A1 (3) | Elementary Italian I

A thorough, basic introduction to the Italian language for those with little or no previous experience, the course teaches essential vocabulary and grammar and develops students’ ability to communicate in an authentic linguistic context.

ITL 3832 – A1/A2 (3) | Elementary Italian II

Designed for students who already have some knowledge of Italian, the course revises basic grammar and vocabulary before progressing to more complex structures and functions leading up to the next, Intermediate, level. Classes are conducted mainly in Italian, with ample opportunity for student oral practice.

ITL 4831 – A2/B1 (3) | Intermediate Italian I

This course helps students to develop their ability to communicate effectively and accurately, using an expanded range of vocabulary. Conversation practice improves listening and interpretation skills. Reading and writing exercises improve skills in understanding prose and writing. Prerequisite: successful completion 3/4 semesters of Italian.

ITL 4832 - B1/B2 (3) | Intermediate Italian II

This course enables students to understand and respond to quite complex lines of argument, both in oral and in written form. Students are introduced to more complex forms of grammar and more sophisticated vocabulary, to give them the ability to carry out and refine skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing in Italian. Upon successful completion of the 3-credit course, students continue with three 4-credit courses taught progressively one at a time, each with a four-week duration. An examination is administered at the end of each course.

ITL 3842 – A1/A2 (4) | Elementary Italian II

Designed for students who already have some knowledge of Italian, the course revises basic grammar and vocabulary before progressing to more complex structures and functions leading up to the next, Intermediate, level. Conversation is a central part of every lesson. Classes are conducted mainly in Italian. Prerequisites: One or two semesters of Italian and/or a pass at ITL 3821 level, and/or min. 70/100 score on the diagnostic test.

ITL 4841 A2/B1 (4) | Intermediate Italian I

This course helps students to develop their ability to communicate effectively and accurately, using an expanded range of vocabulary. Conversation practice improves listening and interpretation skills for better understanding and response in authentic Italian context. Reading and writing exercises improve skills in understanding prose and writing. Prerequisites: Two or three semesters of Italian and/or a pass at 3822 level.

ITL 4842 – B1/B2 (4) | Intermediate Italian II

This course builds upon the skills gained in Intermediate level and develops them to enable students to understand and respond to quite complex lines of argument, both in oral and in written form. Students review complex grammar structures and practice exercises in reading, composition, phonetics, syntax, and style as well as conversation. Prerequisites: Three or four semesters of Italian and/or a pass at 4841 level.

ITL XXXX B2/C1 (4) course code to be confirmed | Advanced Italian

This course introduces students to advanced structures and vocabulary, which will enable them to interact with the Italian world at a sophisticated level. It enables them to understand lectures and complex lines of argument. They should become fluent and spontaneous in written production and verbal interaction. Prerequisites: Four/five semesters of Italian and/or a pass at ITL 4842 level.

ITL XXXX C2 (4) course code to be confirmed | Proficiency

In this course students with a high level of proficiency in written and oral communication practice focus on a particular skill or topic. Courses include test preparation classes for CILS, the Certification of Italian as a Foreign Language (Certificazione di Italiano come Lingua Straniera) or CELI, the Certificate of Knowledge of Italian Language (Certificato di Conoscenza della Lingua). Prerequisites: Five/six semesters of Italian and/or a pass at ITL Advanced level.

The Music Program

For music majors who do not want to fall behind during a semester abroad, or for those with an interest in music, an exciting Music Program is available, taught in a multicultural environment in conjunction with Saint Louis College of Music, founded in 1976 and authorized to issue Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees by the Italian Ministry of Education, Universities and Research. Students take up to 15 Richmond credits and may then take an additional music course.

As this program is taught by the Saint Louis College of Music, Richmond does not award the academic credit. Students receive a Saint Louis College of Music certificate authenticating work completed and should confirm the status of credit transfer for courses taken at Saint Louis with their home institution.

Music classes are taught in the evenings and do not conflict with the majority of the Richmond courses. Richmond students take their music classes in a truly international context, with Italian and other international students at Saint Louis College of Music, conveniently located in Monti neighborhood, just a short distance from the Richmond Center.

Instruction is in Italian, but all music instructors speak and understand the English language.

The Music Program at a Glance (up to 18 credits)

Intensive language classes during orientation (2 credits)

Three to four other classes of your choice among the academic offer (10 to 13 credits)

One or two music classes with other international students (for possibly extra transferable credits) in the following:

  • Bass
  • Drums
  • Guitar
  • Percussion
  • Saxophone, Trumpet, Trombone
  • Vocals

The study of each instrument will focus on thematic developments and applications, combos for group practicing, history of jazz or rock, improvisation sessions.

MSC BS001 - Bass
Bass Lab, 12 hrs
Rhythm Session, 9 hrs
Ensemble, 14 hrs
Jazz /Rock History, 10 hrs (optional)
Improvisation, 7/8 hrs (subject to audition)

MSC DS001 - Drums
Drums Lab, 12 hrs
Rhythmic Session, 9 hrs
Ensemble, 14 hrs
Jazz /Rock History, 10 hrs (optional)
Improvisation, 7/8 hrs (subject to audition)

MSC GT001 - Guitar
Reading/Harmony, 12 hrs lab
Rhythm Session, 9 hrs lab
Ensemble, 14 hrs
Jazz /Rock History, 10 hrs (optional)
Improvisation, 7/8 hrs (subject to audition)

MSC PS001 - Percussion
Percussions Lab, 15 hrs
Cuban Santeria, 14 hrs
2nd Ensemble, 14 hrs
Jazz /Rock History, 10 hrs (optional)
Improvisation, 7/8 hrs (subject to audition)

MSC STT 001 - Sax/Trumpet/Trombone
Brass Section, 15 hrs
Combo, 12 hrs
Ensemble, 14 hrs
Jazz/Rock History, 10 hrs (optional)
Improvisation, 7/8 hrs (subject to audition)

MSC VC001- Vocals
Vocal Lab, 10/12 hrs
Choir, 20/24 hrs
Ensemble, 12/16 hrs
Jazz /Rock History, 10 hrs (optional)
Improvisation, 7/8 hrs (subject to audition)

For more information on Saint Louis College of Music visit www.slmc.it