Study Abroad in Florence, Italy - Internship

Intern Abroad in Florence: Courses

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Intensive Language and Internship Preparation Course

Students take a mandatory 2-credit Italian language course during the orientation. Students must take an online entrance test (they will receive a login and password by email) in order to be admitted and be registered for any level higher than Elementary Italian I. Since language demands are more challenging, students are often placed in a lower level than requested. Students should make sure the advisors at their home institutions are informed of this to avoid problems with credit transfer.

Orientation Italian Language Course

ITL 107 (2) | Elementary Italian I

This two-week course is designed for students who have never taken any Italian language course before. Students build an essential vocabulary and assimilate basic grammar and sentence structures. Instruction is based on listening, grammar and comprehension exercises, repetition and easy conversation.

ITL 108 (2) | Elementary Italian II

This two week course is a preparatory course to the intermediate level, designed for students who have already had one or two semesters of Italian. Although the course starts with basic grammar structures of the language, the pace is faster than Italian 107. Conversation is a central part of every lesson. Admission is based on testing in Italian.

ITL 207 (2) | Intermediate Italian I

This two-week course will enable students to develop the ability to communicate in Italian correctly and with expanded vocabulary. Conversational practice, including improved listening and interpreting skills, will encourage students to better understand and respond to normal Italian speech. Exercises in reading and writing will improve skills in understanding prose and in writing letters and simple messages. Admission is based on a placement test in Italian.

ITL 208 (2) | Intermediate Italian II

This two-week course reviews complex grammar structures and provides students with exercises in reading, composition, phonetics, syntax and style. Continued practice in conversation will provide students with increased capability to communicate competently in Italian. Admission is based on testing in Italian.

Students are required to continue their Italian language study throughout the semester, earning a further 6 credits by studying higher levels of language. In addition, students participate in an internship placement and choose one content course (taught in English) related to their internship.

Italian Language Course

ITL 103 (3) | Elementary Italian I

Students build an essential vocabulary and assimilate basic grammar and sentence structures. Listening, grammar and comprehension exercises, repetition and easy conversation.

ITL 104 (3) | Elementary Italian II

This is a preparatory course to the Intermediate level, designed for students who have already had one or two semesters of Italian. Starts with basic grammar structures of the language but moves faster than Italian 103. Conversation is a central part. Admission to the course is based on testing in Italian. Prerequisite: 1 or 2 semesters of Italian.

ITL 203 (3) | Intermediate Italian I

Students develop the ability to communicate correctly with expanded vocabulary. Conversational practice improves listening and interpretation skills for better understanding and response. Reading and writing exercises improve skills in understanding prose and writing letters and simple messages. Admission to the course is based on testing in Italian. Prerequisite: 3 or 4 semesters of Italian.

ITL 204 (3) | Intermediate Italian II

Complex grammar structures are reviewed. Exercises reinforce reading, composition, phonetics, syntax and style. Conversational practice continues. Admission is based on testing in Italian. Prerequisite: 4 or 5 semesters of Italian.

ITL 303 (3) | Advanced Italian

Based on textual analysis of readings from contemporary authors, newspapers and magazines, this course concentrates on the revision of complex syntactic structures and use of synonyms and idiomatic expressions. Prerequisites: 5 or 6 semesters of Italian.

Students intern in companies based in Florence for 12 weeks. Students taking the internship are also required to attend specially designed seminars throughout the semester. The Internship program combines workplace learning with classroom-based study and regular review sessions with workplace supervisors and Richmond faculty. Credit is awarded only after successful completion of all aspects of the program. Internships are unpaid and monitored by the workplace supervisor and a Richmond faculty member.

In addition to working and attending the internship seminars, students are required to submit a journal recording duties and learning, as well as an analysis of specified aspects of the work experience. They must also submit a final research paper describing and analyzing the workplace, the industry and goals achieved. Students give a presentation on their internship.

Assessment is based on the above criteria. Grades of A to F, with pluses and minuses, in accordance with the University grading policy are assigned and recorded on your Richmond transcript.

ARH 486 Internship in Art History

The Florence internship is a student work placement that aims to provide students from all disciplines and majors with the intellectual, professional, and personal skills that will enable them to function well in a culturally diverse working environment in all key job sectors. All internships are supervised by faculty, and all last a minimum of 9 weeks in length and are carried out full time Monday to Thursday/ Friday. Each student will also complete a series of assessments throughout the internship, such as keeping a written journal of their experience, preparing an internship portfolio, and delivering a final presentation. These assessments have been designed to help the student reflect on the skills they are learning and the benefits gained from the internship experience, and also to help them determine if their current career goals are the correct fit for them. During the internship, the staff of the Internship Office and a faculty supervisor work closely with each student to ensure that the placement is a successful one. Students’ final grades are based on several factors including, assignments, presentation, and a report from their workplace supervisor which is taken into consideration.

Art History

ARH 358 (3) | Museums and Galleries of Florence: The Cultures of Display

Focuses on visual culture and specifically on the purpose, role and practice of museums and galleries in Italy by exploring the organization and functioning of its most important museums. Florence offers particularly good examples of active and responsive local, regional and national museums covering a wide range of collections: the Uffizi, the Pitti Palace, the Bargello, Accademia, the Opificio delle Pietre Dure and other great art sites. Through on-site visits to local museums and art institutions, students gain direct knowledge of administrative structures and ideological directions of a wide range of public foundations and institutions dedicated to preserve and propagate culture. This course is designed for students with a major in Art History or for those interested in museum or gallery work.

ADM 486 Internship in Art, Design and Media

The additional course to be taken should be selected from the following:

Art, Design and Media

ADM 103 (spring only) (3) | Introduction to Drawing

Topics include: (i) figure drawing: the study of the figure and form, the human body, its range of movement and importance in perceptions of art and nature. A model is provided and students are encouraged to work in a variety of media; (ii) structure and object: the world of visual analysis as well as a definition of technique. Still-life and objects provide examples for understanding perspective, planning and rendering as well as line, form, shape, space, value and texture; and (iii) outside drawing: the city of Florence and the Tuscan landscape are studies for understanding aerial and linear-perspective. Students experiment with lead, charcoal, conté pencil and crayon and ink.

ADM 306 (spring only) (3) | Intermediate Drawing

This is a continuation of ADM 103 and includes figure drawing, still-life drawing and landscape drawing. Students will be stimulated to go more in-depth into the problematics related to the human figure (anatomy), perspective (several vanishing points) and object drawing (higher complexity, more varied tonality). This course also includes an introduction into a more individual handling of traditional drawing techniques.

ADM 307 (spring only) (3) | Advanced Drawing

This is a continuation of ADM 306 and therefore includes figure drawing, still-life drawing and landscape drawing. Students will be stimulated to search for a more personal way of composing and choosing types of lines and mark making. Assignments are more complex and narrative/illustrative, requiring a more process-like approach, which students are asked to verbalize to their instructor and fellow students.

ADM 215 (3) | Painting in Florence I

This course includes inside assignments and outside painting (from the Boboli gardens, hills around Florence, etc.) The inside assignments are still related to the city of Florence and students work with (their) photographic material. In all paintings students will develop the ability to distinguish the essential qualities of natural form in order to produce the illusion of volume, space and movement on a two dimensional surface. Students are assisted in developing knowledge of color and a sense of structure and composition and experiment with different ways of applying the paint imitating some important painters (Caravaggio, Monet, Seurat, Van Gogh and Picasso).

ADM 311 (3) | Painting in Florence II

Students build on the foundations laid in ADM 215. This course includes open air painting and work in the studio. Particular problems associated with tone and light are studied (side lighting, candle lighting, artificial lighting etc.). This class combines studio practice with discussion, critique and demonstration. Students are encouraged to talk about their work with the instructor and fellow students to clarify their objectives and problems.

ADM 312 (3) | Painting in Florence III

An extension of ADM 311, including outside painting and work in the studio. Structured around specific painting projects to develop the range and technical competence of the student. Professional painting techniques are demonstrated and experimented. There are discussions of topics such as style, color, form, composition and subject matter.

ADM 341 (3) | Photography for the Media

Recommended for communications and journalism majors as well as photographers, this course develops knowledge and experience in photojournalism and documentary photography by studying work of major practitioners and designing and shooting projects using digital equipment. Students need to provide a manual digital camera of at least 7 mega pixel and a laptop. There is a fee of 50 euros for matting and framing.

ARH 358 (3) | Museums and Galleries of Florence: The Cultures of Display

Focuses on visual culture and specifically on the purpose, role and practice of museums and galleries in Italy by exploring the organization and functioning of its most important museums. Florence offers particularly good examples of active and responsive local, regional and national museums covering a wide range of collections: the Uffizi, the Pitti Palace, the Bargello, Accademia, the Opificio delle Pietre Dure and other great art sites. Through on-site visits to local museums and art institutions, students gain direct knowledge of administrative structures and ideological directions of a wide range of public foundations and institutions dedicated to preserve and propagate culture. This course is designed for students with a major in Art History or for those interested in museum or gallery work.

COM 308 spring only (3) | Writing for the Media/Journalism in Italy

This course concentrates on the different styles and tones of voice used in journalism. It focuses on print, although there will be analysis of other media, such as radio and television. Particular attention will be given to the development of writing styles for news, features, interviews and reviews. Students also carry out detailed analysis of information and styles from a range of media. An analysis of the most important characteristics of Italian journalism and of the Italian media system will be developed. Students will be able to publish articles on a newspaper, therefore adding a precious line to their resumé.

COM 486 Internship in Communications

The Florence internship is a student work placement that aims to provide students from all disciplines and majors with the intellectual, professional, and personal skills that will enable them to function well in a culturally diverse working environment in all key job sectors. All internships are supervised by faculty, and all last a minimum of 9 weeks in length and are carried out full time Monday to Thursday/ Friday. Each student will also complete a series of assessments throughout the internship, such as keeping a written journal of their experience, preparing an internship portfolio, and delivering a final presentation. These assessments have been designed to help the student reflect on the skills they are learning and the benefits gained from the internship experience, and also to help them determine if their current career goals are the correct fit for them. During the internship, the staff of the Internship Office and a faculty supervisor work closely with each student to ensure that the placement is a successful one. Students’ final grades are based on several factors including, assignments, presentation, and a report from their workplace supervisor which is taken into consideration.

Communications

ADM 341 (3) | Photography for the Media

Recommended for communications and journalism majors as well as photographers, this course develops knowledge and experience in photojournalism and documentary photography by studying work of major practitioners and designing and shooting projects using digital equipment. Students need to provide a manual digital camera of at least 7 mega pixel and a laptop. There is a fee of 50 euros for matting and framing.

COM 308 spring only (3) | Writing for the Media/Journalism in Italy

This course concentrates on the different styles and tones of voice used in journalism. It focuses on print, although there will be analysis of other media, such as radio and television. Particular attention will be given to the development of writing styles for news, features, interviews and reviews. Students also carry out detailed analysis of information and styles from a range of media. An analysis of the most important characteristics of Italian journalism and of the Italian media system will be developed. Students will be able to publish articles on a newspaper, therefore adding a precious line to their resumé.

HST 315 (3) | Italian Food and Culture

According to anthropologist Jon Holtzman the tastes and flavors of a country’s traditional table are a meaningful representation of its collective memory. This course will thus show the deep link between geography, history and the culture of Italian regional dishes which have made Italy known worldwide. Attention will be devoted to the development of the Italian food culture, and students will be introduced through lectures, seminars, guest lectures and a visit to a wine and olive oil farm in Tuscany, to the ‘invisible’ thread that links the resources of many Italian areas to their food practices. During the first weeks we will also analyze different food practices of the Italian and Mediterranean diet, highlighting regional gastronomic traditions and their origins. Among the topics to be discussed are the issues of Italian regional differences in how food is prepared, the representation of Italian food practices in media and cinema, food symbolism in Italian culture, food ethics and sustainable agriculture, with an examination of today’s fast and slow food traditions in Italy.

MKT 370 spring only (3) | Psychology of Fashion and Luxury Goods

Consumer psychology within the context of the consumption of fashion and luxury products and services is complex and is influenced by many factors. A thorough analysis and understanding of these factors allows organizations to plan effective marketing activities suitable to their target markets. This course enables students to understand the importance of consumer behavior in the process of marketing fashion and luxury goods and services.

ECN 486 Internship in Economics

The Florence internship is a student work placement that aims to provide students from all disciplines and majors with the intellectual, professional, and personal skills that will enable them to function well in a culturally diverse working environment in all key job sectors. All internships are supervised by faculty, and all last a minimum of 9 weeks in length and are carried out full time Monday to Thursday/ Friday. Each student will also complete a series of assessments throughout the internship, such as keeping a written journal of their experience, preparing an internship portfolio, and delivering a final presentation. These assessments have been designed to help the student reflect on the skills they are learning and the benefits gained from the internship experience, and also to help them determine if their current career goals are the correct fit for them. During the internship, the staff of the Internship Office and a faculty supervisor work closely with each student to ensure that the placement is a successful one. Students’ final grades are based on several factors including, assignments, presentation, and a report from their workplace supervisor which is taken into consideration.

Economics

ARH 317 (3) | Italian Fashion

The birth, evolution, decline, revival and most recent developments of Italian fashion from the late gothic period to current “made in Italy” design. Italian fashion styles in relation to art history in an international, social and economic context. Fashion and its relation to culture, subculture, gender and communication. On-site visits illustrate Florence’s dominant role in fashion.

ECN 357 fall only (3) | International Economic Relations

Economic relations between nations and groups of countries. How institutional, political and historical factors shape the economic environment. International cooperation toward development, regional integration, dispute settlement and the steady growth of world trade as well as multilateral trade negotiations, the European Economic Community and the legal framework for world trade.

ENT 315 (3) | Italian Business and Entrepreneurship

This course provides an insight into Italian businesses and entrepreneurship. Family business and entrepreneurship will be placed into a national context and their importance for the Italian economy will be identified. The study of Italian business will analyze the characteristics of family businesses as well as the institutional actors, strategies, policies and initiatives.

INB 306 spring only (3) | European Business Environment

The course focuses on the economic, political and social environment for business in Europe. Within this field, it examines the institutional interplay with the European Union, the contrasting structure of the European economy compared to its major competitors, the single market, the Euro, Foreign Direct Investment, the role of multinationals, and the developing relationship between central and Eastern Europe and the E.U. Several course related visits are arranged. Prerequisite: one marketing or finance course or advisor’s permission.

MKT 315 (3) | Fashion Marketing and Merchandising

This course covers the fundamentals of fashion and the basic principles that govern all fashion movement and change. It examines the history, development, organization and operation of merchandising and marketing activities, trends in industries engaged in producing fashion, purchasing of fashion merchandise, foreign and domestic markets, and the distribution and promotion of fashion. Prerequisite: one marketing or business course or advisor’s permission.

MKT 370 spring only (3) | Psychology of Fashion and Luxury Goods

Consumer psychology within the context of the consumption of fashion and luxury products and services is complex and is influenced by many factors. A thorough analysis and understanding of these factors allows organizations to plan effective marketing activities suitable to their target markets. This course enables students to understand the importance of consumer behavior in the process of marketing fashion and luxury goods and services.

EDU 486 Internship in Education

The Florence internship is a student work placement that aims to provide students from all disciplines and majors with the intellectual, professional, and personal skills that will enable them to function well in a culturally diverse working environment in all key job sectors. All internships are supervised by faculty, and all last a minimum of 9 weeks in length and are carried out full time Monday to Thursday/ Friday. Each student will also complete a series of assessments throughout the internship, such as keeping a written journal of their experience, preparing an internship portfolio, and delivering a final presentation. These assessments have been designed to help the student reflect on the skills they are learning and the benefits gained from the internship experience, and also to help them determine if their current career goals are the correct fit for them. During the internship, the staff of the Internship Office and a faculty supervisor work closely with each student to ensure that the placement is a successful one. Students’ final grades are based on several factors including, assignments, presentation, and a report from their workplace supervisor which is taken into consideration. The additional course to be taken in Florence should be selected from all Humanities courses (for 3 credits) listed on the regular Florence, Italy course page.

INB 486 Internship in International Business

The Florence internship is a student work placement that aims to provide students from all disciplines and majors with the intellectual, professional, and personal skills that will enable them to function well in a culturally diverse working environment in all key job sectors. All internships are supervised by faculty, and all last a minimum of 9 weeks in length and are carried out full time Monday to Thursday/ Friday. Each student will also complete a series of assessments throughout the internship, such as keeping a written journal of their experience, preparing an internship portfolio, and delivering a final presentation. These assessments have been designed to help the student reflect on the skills they are learning and the benefits gained from the internship experience, and also to help them determine if their current career goals are the correct fit for them. During the internship, the staff of the Internship Office and a faculty supervisor work closely with each student to ensure that the placement is a successful one. Students’ final grades are based on several factors including, assignments, presentation, and a report from their workplace supervisor which is taken into consideration.

International Business

ECN 357 fall only (3) | International Economic Relations

Economic relations between nations and groups of countries. How institutional, political and historical factors shape the economic environment. International cooperation toward development, regional integration, dispute settlement and the steady growth of world trade as well as multilateral trade negotiations, the European Economic Community and the legal framework for world trade.

ENT 315 (3) | Italian Business and Entrepreneurship

This course provides an insight into Italian businesses and entrepreneurship. Family business and entrepreneurship will be placed into a national context and their importance for the Italian economy will be identified. The study of Italian business will analyze the characteristics of family businesses as well as the institutional actors, strategies, policies and initiatives.

INB 306 spring only (3) | European Business Environment

The course focuses on the economic, political and social environment for business in Europe. Within this field, it examines the institutional interplay with the European Union, the contrasting structure of the European economy compared to its major competitors, the single market, the Euro, Foreign Direct Investment, the role of multinationals, and the developing relationship between central and Eastern Europe and the E.U. Several course related visits are arranged. Prerequisite: one marketing or finance course or advisor’s permission.

MKT 315 (3) | Fashion Marketing and Merchandising

This course covers the fundamentals of fashion and the basic principles that govern all fashion movement and change. It examines the history, development, organization and operation of merchandising and marketing activities, trends in industries engaged in producing fashion, purchasing of fashion merchandise, foreign and domestic markets, and the distribution and promotion of fashion. Prerequisite: one marketing or business course or advisor’s permission.

MKT 370 spring only (3) | Psychology of Fashion and Luxury Goods

Consumer psychology within the context of the consumption of fashion and luxury products and services is complex and is influenced by many factors. A thorough analysis and understanding of these factors allows organizations to plan effective marketing activities suitable to their target markets. This course enables students to understand the importance of consumer behavior in the process of marketing fashion and luxury goods and services.

INB 486 Internship In Hotel Management and Tourism

The Florence internship is a student work placement that aims to provide students from all disciplines and majors with the intellectual, professional, and personal skills that will enable them to function well in a culturally diverse working environment in all key job sectors. All internships are supervised by faculty, and all last a minimum of 9 weeks in length and are carried out full time Monday to Thursday/ Friday. Each student will also complete a series of assessments throughout the internship, such as keeping a written journal of their experience, preparing an internship portfolio, and delivering a final presentation. These assessments have been designed to help the student reflect on the skills they are learning and the benefits gained from the internship experience, and also to help them determine if their current career goals are the correct fit for them. During the internship, the staff of the Internship Office and a faculty supervisor work closely with each student to ensure that the placement is a successful one. Students’ final grades are based on several factors including, assignments, presentation, and a report from their workplace supervisor which is taken into consideration.

Hotel Management and Tourism

ARH 317 (3) | Italian Fashion

The birth, evolution, decline, revival and most recent developments of Italian fashion from the late gothic period to current “made in Italy” design. Italian fashion styles in relation to art history in an international, social and economic context. Fashion and its relation to culture, subculture, gender and communication. On-site visits illustrate Florence’s dominant role in fashion.

ECN 357 fall only (3) | International Economic Relations

Economic relations between nations and groups of countries. How institutional, political and historical factors shape the economic environment. International cooperation toward development, regional integration, dispute settlement and the steady growth of world trade as well as multilateral trade negotiations, the European Economic Community and the legal framework for world trade.

ENT 315 (3) | Italian Business and Entrepreneurship

This course provides an insight into Italian businesses and entrepreneurship. Family business and entrepreneurship will be placed into a national context and their importance for the Italian economy will be identified. The study of Italian business will analyze the characteristics of family businesses as well as the institutional actors, strategies, policies and initiatives.

HST 315 (3) | Italian Food and Culture

According to anthropologist Jon Holtzman the tastes and flavors of a country’s traditional table are a meaningful representation of its collective memory. This course will thus show the deep link between geography, history and the culture of Italian regional dishes which have made Italy known worldwide. Attention will be devoted to the development of the Italian food culture, and students will be introduced through lectures, seminars, guest lectures and a visit to a wine and olive oil farm in Tuscany, to the ‘invisible’ thread that links the resources of many Italian areas to their food practices. During the first weeks we will also analyze different food practices of the Italian and Mediterranean diet, highlighting regional gastronomic traditions and their origins. Among the topics to be discussed are the issues of Italian regional differences in how food is prepared, the representation of Italian food practices in media and cinema, food symbolism in Italian culture, food ethics and sustainable agriculture, with an examination of today’s fast and slow food traditions in Italy.

INB 306 spring only (3) | European Business Environment

The course focuses on the economic, political and social environment for business in Europe. Within this field, it examines the institutional interplay with the European Union, the contrasting structure of the European economy compared to its major competitors, the single market, the Euro, Foreign Direct Investment, the role of multinationals, and the developing relationship between central and Eastern Europe and the E.U. Several course related visits are arranged. Prerequisite: one marketing or finance course or advisor’s permission.

MKT 486 Internship in Marketing

The Florence internship is a student work placement that aims to provide students from all disciplines and majors with the intellectual, professional, and personal skills that will enable them to function well in a culturally diverse working environment in all key job sectors. All internships are supervised by faculty, and all last a minimum of 9 weeks in length and are carried out full time Monday to Thursday/ Friday. Each student will also complete a series of assessments throughout the internship, such as keeping a written journal of their experience, preparing an internship portfolio, and delivering a final presentation. These assessments have been designed to help the student reflect on the skills they are learning and the benefits gained from the internship experience, and also to help them determine if their current career goals are the correct fit for them. During the internship, the staff of the Internship Office and a faculty supervisor work closely with each student to ensure that the placement is a successful one. Students’ final grades are based on several factors including, assignments, presentation, and a report from their workplace supervisor which is taken into consideration.

Marketing

ARH 317 (3) | Italian Fashion

The birth, evolution, decline, revival and most recent developments of Italian fashion from the late gothic period to current “made in Italy” design. Italian fashion styles in relation to art history in an international, social and economic context. Fashion and its relation to culture, subculture, gender and communication. On-site visits illustrate Florence’s dominant role in fashion.

MKT 315 (3) | Fashion Marketing and Merchandising

This course covers the fundamentals of fashion and the basic principles that govern all fashion movement and change. It examines the history, development, organization and operation of merchandising and marketing activities, trends in industries engaged in producing fashion, purchasing of fashion merchandise, foreign and domestic markets, and the distribution and promotion of fashion. Prerequisite: one marketing or business course or advisor’s permission.

ECN 357 fall only (3) | International Economic Relations

Economic relations between nations and groups of countries. How institutional, political and historical factors shape the economic environment. International cooperation toward development, regional integration, dispute settlement and the steady growth of world trade as well as multilateral trade negotiations, the European Economic Community and the legal framework for world trade.

ENT 315 (3) | Italian Business and Entrepreneurship

This course provides an insight into Italian businesses and entrepreneurship. Family business and entrepreneurship will be placed into a national context and their importance for the Italian economy will be identified. The study of Italian business will analyze the characteristics of family businesses as well as the institutional actors, strategies, policies and initiatives.

INB 306 spring only (3) | European Business Environment

The course focuses on the economic, political and social environment for business in Europe. Within this field, it examines the institutional interplay with the European Union, the contrasting structure of the European economy compared to its major competitors, the single market, the Euro, Foreign Direct Investment, the role of multinationals, and the developing relationship between central and Eastern Europe and the E.U. Several course related visits are arranged. Prerequisite: one marketing or finance course or advisor’s permission.