AIFS Abroad

AIFS Summer Internships in London, England
Summer 2019
Course Descriptions

   

International Internship 6972 (6) (3)
The internship course offers students an intensive academic experience and the opportunity to study working life in London. In addition to the internship placement, students are required to attend specifically designed classroom-based seminars, submit a weekly journal recording duties and learning, as well as an analysis of specified aspects of the work experience and complete a final research paper describing and analyzing the workplace, the industry and goals achieved. Students will be required to make a presentation on their internship. Six units of credit for the 12-week program and three units of credit for the 9-week program will be awarded for the placement and accompanying classroom-based academic study. Internships are unpaid and supervised and monitored by the workplace supervisor and a Richmond faculty member.

Assessment is based on all the above criteria. Grades of A to F with pluses and minuses in accordance with the University grading policy are assigned and recorded on your Richmond transcript.

Seminars and interviews are conducted throughout the first three weeks to prepare students to:

  • analyze skills, interests and abilities
  • establish appropriate objectives
  • interview in a professional setting
  • respond appropriately to situations in the workplace
  • develop communication skills
  • work in an international environment
  • focus on career options

9-Week Program Only

Students take the required course Contemporary British Culture (SCL 5450) which continues on selected Fridays during the placement, plus 1 x 3-week course from the Session A course list below. The Contemporary British Culture course is taught in the afternoon so students need to select a Session A course that is taught in the morning. Contact your Admissions Officer for an up to date list of available courses. Students must also be available for interviews during these three weeks.
Mandatory Course
Course Code and Credits: SCL 5450 (3)
Course Title: Contemporary British Culture (3)
Course Description:
This 3-credit course is required and taught intensively during the first three weeks and continues on Fridays and on selected evenings during the placement. It is designed to support integration into the work-place. Students are equipped with a general understanding of salient features of contemporary British society and culture: education, ethnicity, social class, politics, the monarchy, attitudes toward business and welfare and British perceptions of the U.S. Field trips provide further information and prepare students for contact with British colleagues.

Session A
Course Code and Credits: ADM 3160A (3)
Course Title: Foundations in Photography
Course Description:
This course concentrates on developing the student’s visual intelligence via photography. Technically, students will learn to use digital Single Lens Reflex cameras and Photoshop for image workflow and editing. By looking at the work of a range of artists, students will be introduced to some of the theories that underpin photographic practice and consider photography’s place and role in contemporary culture. Throughout the course students make images which finally result in an edited portfolio of photographic prints.
Course Code and Credits: AVC 5200A (3)
Course Title: Museums and Galleries of London: The Cultures of Display
Course Description:
Considers the nature of museums and art galleries and their role and function in our society. Studies the workings of the art market, conservation, restoration, the investment potential of art and art world crime. Students visit many of the great London collections as part of this course. Visits require some travel and entrance costs.
Course Code and Credits: CRM 5400A (3)
Course Title: Terrorism and Counterterrorism
Course Description:
In the wake of 9-11 Islamist attack and the 22 July 2011 Norway ‘lone wolf’ radical right massacre, terrorism and counterterrorism have come to dominate political agendas and media discourse across the US and Europe. Through a comparative analysis of the history of US and EU responses to 21st century terrorism this class studies the nature of the threats to Western security by examining types of terrorism and the development, strategies and theories surrounding terrorism. Given special attention in this class are: victims and perpetrators; processes of violent radicalization; typologies of terror (religious extremism, political violence, regional separatism, state-sponsored terror and animal rights/ecological activism); and what can be done to counter and/or limit terrorism (surveillance/policing/de-radicalization/education/social media); as well as how effective such practices are.
Course Code and Credits: ENV 5100A (3)
Course Title: Environmental Ethics: Green Principles
Course Description:
Develops students’ understanding of the concepts of environmental ethics through an analysis of historical and modern issues. The role of humans within nature and anthropogenic effects upon nature will be discussed along with typical environmental issues such as climate change, pollution, population issues, energy issues, conservation, women in the environment and animal rights.
Course Code and Credits: MGT 5400A (3)
Course Title: Organisational Behaviour
Course Description:
This course explores the structure and nature of organisations and the contribution that communication and human behaviour makes to organisational performance. The objective of the course is to equip students with a critical understanding of how organizations function. It will explore the impact of human and organizational factors on the establishment, development and performance of organizations, using a wide range of management theories. The importance of cross-cultural differences and its consequences for the management of global organizations will be highlighted. This course will draw from different disciplines within the social sciences, including psychology, political science, anthropology and sociology, insisting on the connections between these different fields and theories.
Course Code and Credits: MKT 5410A (3)
Course Title: Psychology of Fashion and Luxury Goods
Course Description:
This course enables students to understand the importance of consumer behavior in the process of marketing fashion and luxury goods and services.
Course Code and Credits: MKT 6220A (3)
Course Title: Digitial Marketing and Social Media
Course Description:
Provides students with an insight into the techniques and processes involved in creating and maintaining a marketing presence on the Internet.
Course Code and Credits: HST 5425A (3)
Course Title: Historical London
Course Description:
From the creation of Londinium by the Romans to the great modern metropolis, this course traces the growth and the changing functions, institutions and architecture of London. Readings from contemporary writers, describing the London they knew and visits to selected monuments are an integral part of this course. Visits require some travel and entrance costs.
Course Code and Credits: COM 4415A (3)
Course Title: Contemporary London Performance
Course Description:
This course aims to introduce students to the contemporary performance scene in London – focusing upon music, dance, performance art, installation art and fringe theater. Themed, in-class sessions will be supplemented by frequent field trips to performance venues in the London area. Students should budget for an additional £75 course fee for tickets to events.
Course Code and Credits: COM 6400A (3)
Course Title: Fashion and Media
Course Description:
This course traces the multiple connections between the fashion and media industries. It emphasizes the material realities, pragmatic and creative dynamisms, fantasy components, and essential visuality of fashion. It also highlights how London and cities in general function as creative agencies for fermenting style and fashion ideas and attitudes
Course Code and Credits: PSY 4215A (3)
Course Title: Biological Basis of Human Behavior
Course Description:
Exposes students to the relationship between biology and behavior. Topics covered are: motivational behavior; social behavior; sleep; perception; learning and memory. Special discussion topics include: sexual behavior; eating disorders; emotions and consciousness. In addition, the course looks at perceptual and memory disorders.

12-Week Program Only

Students take the Internship course plus two 3-credit classroom-based courses of their choice from those listed below. Students can select either:

  • 1 x 3-week course from the Session A course list plus 1 x 3-week course from the Session B course list OR
  • 2 x 6-week courses from the 6-week course list

Students must also be available for interviews during these six weeks.

Session A
Course Code and Credits: ADM 3160A (3)
Course Title: Foundations in Photography
Course Description:
This course concentrates on developing the student’s visual intelligence via photography. Technically, students will learn to use digital Single Lens Reflex cameras and Photoshop for image workflow and editing. By looking at the work of a range of artists, students will be introduced to some of the theories that underpin photographic practice and consider photography’s place and role in contemporary culture. Throughout the course students make images which finally result in an edited portfolio of photographic prints.
Course Code and Credits: AVC 5200A (3)
Course Title: Museums and Galleries of London: The Cultures of Display
Course Description:
Considers the nature of museums and art galleries and their role and function in our society. Studies the workings of the art market, conservation, restoration, the investment potential of art and art world crime. Students visit many of the great London collections as part of this course. Visits require some travel and entrance costs.
Course Code and Credits: CRM 5400A (3)
Course Title: Terrorism and Counterterrorism
Course Description:
In the wake of 9-11 Islamist attack and the 22 July 2011 Norway ‘lone wolf’ radical right massacre, terrorism and counterterrorism have come to dominate political agendas and media discourse across the US and Europe. Through a comparative analysis of the history of US and EU responses to 21st century terrorism this class studies the nature of the threats to Western security by examining types of terrorism and the development, strategies and theories surrounding terrorism. Given special attention in this class are: victims and perpetrators; processes of violent radicalization; typologies of terror (religious extremism, political violence, regional separatism, state-sponsored terror and animal rights/ecological activism); and what can be done to counter and/or limit terrorism (surveillance/policing/de-radicalization/education/social media); as well as how effective such practices are.
Course Code and Credits: ENV 5100A (3)
Course Title: Environmental Ethics: Green Principles
Course Description:
Develops students’ understanding of the concepts of environmental ethics through an analysis of historical and modern issues. The role of humans within nature and anthropogenic effects upon nature will be discussed along with typical environmental issues such as climate change, pollution, population issues, energy issues, conservation, women in the environment and animal rights.
Course Code and Credits: MGT 5400A (3)
Course Title: Organisational Behaviour
Course Description:
This course explores the structure and nature of organisations and the contribution that communication and human behaviour makes to organisational performance. The objective of the course is to equip students with a critical understanding of how organizations function. It will explore the impact of human and organizational factors on the establishment, development and performance of organizations, using a wide range of management theories. The importance of cross-cultural differences and its consequences for the management of global organizations will be highlighted. This course will draw from different disciplines within the social sciences, including psychology, political science, anthropology and sociology, insisting on the connections between these different fields and theories.
Course Code and Credits: MKT 5410A (3)
Course Title: Psychology of Fashion and Luxury Goods
Course Description:
This course enables students to understand the importance of consumer behavior in the process of marketing fashion and luxury goods and services.
Course Code and Credits: MKT 6220A (3)
Course Title: Digitial Marketing and Social Media
Course Description:
Provides students with an insight into the techniques and processes involved in creating and maintaining a marketing presence on the Internet.
Course Code and Credits: HST 5425A (3)
Course Title: Historical London
Course Description:
From the creation of Londinium by the Romans to the great modern metropolis, this course traces the growth and the changing functions, institutions and architecture of London. Readings from contemporary writers, describing the London they knew and visits to selected monuments are an integral part of this course. Visits require some travel and entrance costs.
Course Code and Credits: COM 4415A (3)
Course Title: Contemporary London Performance
Course Description:
This course aims to introduce students to the contemporary performance scene in London – focusing upon music, dance, performance art, installation art and fringe theater. Themed, in-class sessions will be supplemented by frequent field trips to performance venues in the London area. Students should budget for an additional £75 course fee for tickets to events.
Course Code and Credits: COM 6400A (3)
Course Title: Fashion and Media
Course Description:
This course traces the multiple connections between the fashion and media industries. It emphasizes the material realities, pragmatic and creative dynamisms, fantasy components, and essential visuality of fashion. It also highlights how London and cities in general function as creative agencies for fermenting style and fashion ideas and attitudes
Course Code and Credits: PSY 4215A (3)
Course Title: Biological Basis of Human Behavior
Course Description:
Exposes students to the relationship between biology and behavior. Topics covered are: motivational behavior; social behavior; sleep; perception; learning and memory. Special discussion topics include: sexual behavior; eating disorders; emotions and consciousness. In addition, the course looks at perceptual and memory disorders.

Session B
Course Code and Credits: AVC 5200B (3)
Course Title: Museums and Galleries of London: The Cultures of Display
Course Description:
Considers the nature of museums and art galleries and their role and function in our society. Studies the workings of the art market, conservation, restoration, the investment potential of art and art world crime. Students visit many of the great London collections as part of this course. Visits require some travel and entrance costs.
Course Code and Credits: COM 5105B (3)
Course Title: Modern Popular Music
Course Description:
An interdisciplinary course examining the historical, sociological, aesthetic, technological, and commercial elements of contemporary popular music. It deals specifically with the origins and development of contemporary popular music; the relationship between culture, subculture, style and popular music; and the production and marketing of the music. Audio-visual resources are combined with lectures, and where appropriate, field trips to concerts in London.
Course Code and Credits: COM 5218B (3)
Course Title: Celebrity and Fan Culture
Course Description:
Charts the development and critical context of contemporary celebrity and fan cultures. Outlines key theoretical approaches. Explores the topic through a variety of media, from artists like Andy Warhol, Lady Gaga, Eminem and Alison Jackson, to fanfic and other fan culture artifacts. Considers the creation and reception of celebrity texts: for example, around Harry Potter, and fanhood as a performative critique of celebrity. Examines relevant PR and media strategies.
Course Code and Credits: FNN 5200B (3)
Course Title: Corporate Finance
Course Description:
Examines the financial needs of corporations and the range of mechanisms available to meet them. The key concept of the time value of money is studied and applied to several decision models in capital budgeting and investment valuation. Other basic theories examined include risk versus return, modern portfolio theory, and basic financial statement analysis. Different financial requirements are considered with some emphasis in comparing internal and external sources of funds, their relative availability, and costs.
Course Code and Credits: MKT4200B (3)
Course Title: Introduction to the Business of Fashion
Course Description:
An introduction to the world of fashion from a business point of view. The course investigates the notion of what a customer is and separates this out from customers within the context of business-to-business relationships. The course further investigates notions of market segmentation, positioning, promotion and branding and ends with discussions on the role of business strategy within the fashion business.
Course Code and Credits: MKT5205B (3)
Course Title: Consumer Behaviour
Course Description:
The course will focus on the study of consumers and their behavioural patterns in the consumption and purchase of product/services as well as the impact of information technology (social media, digital media) on consumer behaviour. It examines behavioural and cognitive psychology and their application in order to measure and interpreting consumers’ formation of attitudes and beliefs. The course provides a psychoanalytic perspective in order to inform the development of marketing strategy as well as to what motivates individual to purchase a specific branded products. It provides an in depth understanding of the consumption culture in modern and postmodern life and how marketers develop life style branding strategies to attract different group of consumer market segments.
Course Code and Credits: MKT 6220B (3)
Course Title: Digital Marketing and Social Media
Course Description:
Provides students with an insight into the techniques and processes involved in creating and maintaining a marketing presence on the Internet.
Course Code and Credits: LIT 5100B (3)
Course Title: British Fantasy Writing: Magic Memory
Course Description:
This course explores the long-standing, unique and vibrant tradition of Fantasy literature in Britain. It will focus on the major fantasies from the past 120 years and their filmed adaptations, including works by Bram Stoker, J.R.R. Tolkien and J.K. Rowling. It will look at how these texts and their filmic counterparts revisit older ideas for novel purposes. Where possible, field trips to sites such as Strawberry Hill (the first gothic home) or Harry Potter London tours will be arranged to supplement this course. Students should budget $50 for these field trips.
Course Code and Credits: PLT 5205B (3)
Course Title: British Politics: Inside Parliament
Course Description:
An introduction to the political system of the United Kingdom. Topics include: the constitution; concepts of democracy; the role of the legislature; the Cabinet; the Head of State/Head of Government; the electoral system, pressure and interest groups and party political programs. Includes meetings at the House of Commons, conducted by a Member of Parliament. Limited to 20 students.
Course Code and Credits: PSY 5215B (3)
Course Title: Personality, Individual Differences and Intelligence
Course Description:
The purpose of this course is to increase students’ awareness of the variety of theoretical viewpoints that exist regarding the nature of human individual differences and the factors that influence human behavior.

6-Week Courses
Course Code and Credits: ACC 4205AB (3)
Course Title: Managerial Accounting
Course Description:
This course introduces students to the generation of cost data for the preparation of proper, representative financial statements, and for optimal planning and control of routine operations and long range organizational goals. It focuses on the uses of formal cost accounting systems and quantitative techniques to make managerial decisions. Topics include: direct absorption income statements, job and process costing, allocation and proration, pro-forma and capital budgeting.
Course Code and Credits: ENT 4200AB (3)
Course Title: Introduction to Entrepreneurship
Course Description:
This course provides an introduction to the concept and practice of entrepreneurship.
Course Code and Credits: FLM 5410AB (3)
Course Title: Gender in Film
Course Description:
This course explores key concepts that have shaped the study of gender in film in the past 50 years. It considers different spectators’ viewing positions and analyzes how historical and social changes in the construction of masculinities and femininities have shaped specific film genres. A variety of issues related to sexuality, race/ ethnicity and non-western representations are also considered.
Course Code and Credits: MTH 4120AB (3)
Course Title: Probability and Statistics I
Course Description:
An introductory course in probability primarily designed for business economics and psychology majors. The course coverage will include: descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory, random variables and expectations, discrete probability distributions (Binomial and Poisson distributions), continuous probability distribution (Normal distribution), linear regression analysis and correlations, elementary hypothesis testing and Chi-square tests, non-parametric methods and SPSS lab sessions targeting applications of statistical concepts to business, economics and psychology and interpretations of hardcopies. All practical work will be produced using SPSS statistical software.
Course Code and Credits: PHL 4100AB (3)
Course Title: Introduction to Philosophy
Course Description:
This course introduces students to discipline of philosophy. It examines various branches of philosophy including logic, epistemology, ontology, ethics, political and religious philosophy. It takes a topic-based rather than historical approach, and looks at sets of problems such as the mind-body problem, empiricism versus rationalism, and subjectivism versus naturalism. To this end, various important Western philosophers will be considered including Aristotle, Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant and Russell.
Course Code and Credits: PLT 5415AB (3)
Course Title: Politics of sub-Saharan Africa
Course Description:
Follows the attempt to promote stability, economic development, and democratic systems of government in sub-Saharan Africa, and engages with the core issue of the relationship between the state, civil society, and external interests in the region. The many social, political, economic and security problems that hamper the development project are addressed, by following a historical trajectory from the colonial era through to modern times.