Study Abroad in London, England - Black London

Study Abroad in London – Black London: Academics

Richmond, The American International University in London

Like the city in which it is located, Richmond, The American International University in London, provides a diverse, multicultural environment. The University offers small classes in a wide variety of disciplines taught by faculty from leading British and American institutions in fully accredited BA, BS, MA and MBA programs. During the academic year, students come to Richmond from more than 100 different countries, although the summer school is predominantly American. Small classes and personal attention from the faculty, an extensive extracurricular program and a wide range of courses make Richmond an ideal summer study choice.

Richmond is an independent, co-educational, non-profit international liberal arts and professional studies University. The original Richmond College, founded in 1843, was a constituent institution of the University of London until the founding in 1970 of the present University which bears its name and occupies its site. The University is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, one of the regional accrediting bodies recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. In addition to the U.S. degree granting authority, it has U.K. taught degree awarding powers granted by the U.K. Privy Council. It is the first university in the U.K. to have dual degree awarding powers.

Academic Overview & Policies

In addition to the Black London Program, students may choose a 3-week course in Session A and/or C of the Traditional Academic Program for a 6 or 9-week experience.

Academic administration is carried out by the Academic Deans under the supervision of the Richmond Provost. Instructors are drawn from Richmond, the colleges of the University of London, other London institutions of higher education and other professions.

Assessment and grading The course work required varies with the nature of the material covered. Instructors are likely to use some combination of quizzes, papers, presentations, projects, and final exams. Grades are awarded by instructors on a 4.0 scale, which assigns values to pluses and minuses within the letter grade awards:

A Outstanding achievement
B Achievement above that necessary to complete the course requirements
C Satisfactory
D Work barely meets requirements
F Fail
I Incomplete (this grade may stand only for one week after completion of the course)
W Withdraw

Grades No AIFS participant is permitted to take a course without receiving a letter grade. Pass/Fail grade options are not available.

Attendance is required to receive full credit. Students exceeding the permitted number of absences may lose all or partial credit. Classes are scheduled Monday through Friday. Students are not permitted to take final exams early.

Transcripts are issued by Richmond, The American International University in London. One official copy of the transcript will be mailed to the student’s home college or university.

Course Description

SCL 5445B (3) Black London

Examines the history of the African Diaspora in London over approximately the last 300 years, paying particular attention to changes in the demographic background to this Diaspora and the ensuing debates around the various notions of Blackness. The context to the course is the growth of London as the hub of an imperial system underscored by notions of race, and the subsequent changes to the metropolis in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. A theoretical underpinning of the course is that London is one of the centres of a Black Atlantic, as understood through the works of Paul Gilroy. The course will open up social relations at the heart of Black London’s history, including class, gender and sexuality. London has a long history of ideological movements driven by the conditions of the Black Atlantic, such as: Abolitionism, anti-colonialism, Pan Africanism and anti-racist struggles within Britain; all of these will be within the parameters of the course. Finally, the cultural impact of the Black Atlantic on London will be looked at in all its diversity, including, but not restricted to: literature, religion, music, fashion, language, cuisine, etc.