AIFS Abroad

AIFS Study Abroad in London, England
Fall 2016 and Spring 2017
Course Descriptions

   

Traditional Academic Program

In addition to over 750 courses from a wide range of academic areas, the program at Richmond provides the opportunity for students to select from a core of courses—the London Core—that make special use of the resources available in London. These courses offer students an exciting opportunity to learn about the history, art, architecture, culture, economics and politics of Britain while studying in the very country they are learning about. Many of these classes also satisfy major or general education requirements. To capitalize on opportunities at this unique multicultural University, study abroad students are strongly encouraged to choose at least three of their five courses from the following London Core courses and select the remainder from Richmond’s regular degree course offerings. However this is not required and students are free to select any classes they want from Richmond’s regular degree course offerings, subject to meeting any pre-requisites.

Individual faculty members determine the content of their own courses. However, co-curricular and extra-curricular activities are usually offered (for a nominal additional fee) to complement students’ classroom experiences, enhance their academic understanding and increase their cultural awareness. Typical activities, designed to complement the London Core courses, may include:

  • Tour of Parliament and meeting with a Member of Parliament
  • Visits to local art galleries, including the Tate Modern and Tate Britain
  • Theater performances
  • Visits to London museums including the British Museum, National Gallery and Victoria and Albert Museum
  • Tour of the Bank of England
  • Visits to multinational companies
  • Visiting lecture series—previous speakers have included representatives from world politics, international businesses, pressure groups and the theater/arts industry

London Core Courses

A sample and abbreviated summary of the 750 courses offered at Richmond are below. For a full list of courses, including prerequisites, please see www.richmond.ac.uk/admitted-students/timetables/

ART, DESIGN AND MEDIA
Course Code and Credits: ADM 5200
Course Title: Video Production (3)
Course Description:
A ‘hands-on’ video course involving most aspects of production from camera work and sound recording to editing and audio dubbing. The theory and practice of video technology are taught through a series of group exercises and out of class assignments. Students also study a range of classic videos and film as a means of understanding the language of the medium. A studio fee is levied on this course.
Course Code and Credits: ADM 5405
Course Title: Photography: Theory and Practice (3)
Course Description:
This course is designed to familiarize students with skills which combine visual research, photographic composition, analogue camera operation and printing, together with conceptual ideas, especially those of narrative photography. Students provide their own film and photographic paper. The University has cameras for student use, although it is recommended that students provide their own manual 35mm SLR camera.

ART HISTORY
Course Code and Credits: AVC 5200
Course Title: Museums and Galleries of London (3)
Course Description:
Considers the nature of museums and art galleries and their role and function in our society and culture. Students study the workings of the art market and a variety of other topics that impinge upon it, such as conservation, restoration, the investment potential of art, and art world crime. Students visit many of the great London galleries and museums with their rich intercultural collections, as part of this course. A university-level survey of the history of international art is strongly recommended as a prerequisite. Prerequisite: ARH 3100
Course Code and Credits: AVC 5400
Course Title: British Art and Architecture (3)
Course Description:
Considers British painting, sculpture, architecture, and interior design since the 1500s, in their historical, cultural, social and political contexts. Students make regular visits to buildings and museums with their rich intercultural collections, to discuss works on site.
Course Code and Credits: AVC 5205
Course Title: Art In Context (3)
Course Description:
This course gives students the opportunity to critically engage with some of the major themes, methods, and approaches in contemporary art. Weekly visits to museums, galleries, and exhibitions, with their rich intercultural collections, provide an opportunity for students to test theories put forward in class in front of original art works.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS
Course Code and Credits: FNN 5200
Course Title: Corporate Finance (3)
Course Description:
Examines the financial needs of corporations and the range of mechanisms available to meet them. The concept of the time value of money is studied and applied to several decision models in capital budgeting and investment valuation. Other basic theories of finance examined include risk and return and financial statement analysis. Different financial requirements are examined with an emphasis on a comparison of internal and external sources of funds and their relative availability and cost. Covers topics such as capital budgeting, cost of capital, dividend policy, capital structure, current asset management and portfolio theory.
Course Code and Credits: MGT 5220
Course Title: Legal & Ethical Concepts in Management (3)
Course Description:
Concentrates on the legal framework within which most business takes place. Topics include corporate problems of raising and maintaining capital by shares; relationships of board of directors to shareholders; respective rights and obligations; relationships of companies to third parties; control and the principle of majority rule. Examples are used of the way statute and judge-made case law has dealt with these problems.
Course Code and Credits: MGT 5400
Course Title: Organizational Behavior (3)
Course Description:
This course explores the structure and nature of organizations and the contribution that communication and human behavior makes to organizational performance. The course will address not only macro level issues relating to the environment and context within which organizations operate, but also the micro level influences of people as individuals and groups, their motivations and operating styles. The management of people for successful organizational performance will be emphasized by considering work environmental factors that facilitate or impede organizational success.
Course Code and Credits: MGT 5405
Course Title: Operations Management (3)
Course Description:
Provides a theoretical and practical understanding of operations management, together with the ability to apply some of its major techniques to practical business problems. It includes operations strategy, materials management, production planning and simulation, network planning, variety reduction, quality assurance, quality circles, purchasing, and problems and opportunities of introducing new technology.
Course Code and Credits: MKT 5200
Course Title: Principles of Marketing (3)
Course Description:
The course introduces students to the principles and operations of marketing. Course work includes an in-depth analysis of the strategic role marketing plays in contemporary business from new product development, marketing research and target marketing to consumer behavior analysis, advertising and promotion and personal selling activities. Each variable of the marketing mix will be covered in detail and the macro and micro business environment will be assessed for their impact on marketing planning. Lectures, discussion topics, case studies, videos and practical exercises are used to cover the course material.
Course Code and Credits: MKT 5205
Course Title: Consumer Behavior (3)
Course Description:
The course will focus on the study of consumers and their behavioral patterns in the consumption and purchase of product/ services as well as the impact of information technology (social media, digital media) on consumer behavior. It examines behavioral and cognitive psychology and their application in order to measure and interpret consumers’ formation of attitudes and beliefs. The course provides a psychoanalytic perspective in order to inform the development of marketing strategy as well as to what motivates individuals to purchase specific branded products. It provides an in depth understanding of the consumption culture in modern and post-modern life and how marketers develop life style branding strategies to attract different groups of consumers and market segments.
Course Code and Credits: MKT 5405
Course Title: Fashion Marketing and Retail (3)
Course Description:
This course covers the fundamentals of fashion and the basic principles that govern all fashion movement and change. It examines the history, development, organization and operation of merchandising and marketing activities, trends in industries engaged in producing fashion, purchasing of fashion merchandise, foreign and domestic markets, and the distribution and promotion of fashion.
Course Code and Credits: MKT 5410
Course Title: Psychology of Fashion & Luxury Goods (3)
Course Description:
See Fashion section for course description.
Course Code and Credits: MKT 6220
Course Title: Digital Marketing & Social Media (3)
Course Description:
The course will provide insights into new marketing concepts, tools, technologies and business models to enhance the consumer value creation process. New technologies have created some radical changes in the way companies reach their markets and in particular the emerging phenomenon of social media. This course integrates ideas from the process of gaining traffic or attention on the rapidly emerging and influential social networks including Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google.

COMMUNICATION
Course Code and Credits: COM 5200
Course Title: Mass Communication and Society (3)
Course Description:
In this course, “mass communications” is taken in its broadest sense to include cinema, television, newspapers, magazines, comics, and the Internet, as well as fashion and merchandising. “Society” involves the people who engage with those texts, from critical theorists to fans, censors to consumers. The course examines the relationship between texts and the people at various points during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, from various cultural and national perspectives. Throughout the course, students are encouraged to test and debate established theories by bringing them to bear on everyday popular texts.
Course Code and Credits: COM 5105
Course Title: Modern Popular Music (3)
Course Description:
An interdisciplinary course examining the historical, sociological, aesthetic, technological, and commercial elements of contemporary popular music. It deals specifically with the origins and development of contemporary popular music; the relationship between culture, subculture, style and popular music; and the production and marketing of the music. Audio-visual resources are combined with lectures, and where appropriate, field trips to concerts in London.
Course Code and Credits: COM 5115
Course Title: Sociology of Culture and Sub Culture (3)
Course Description:
Introduces the field of cultural studies by examining various concepts of culture, the positions taken in cultural criticism, and the relationship between social and cultural transformation. Emphasis is placed on differences between U.S. and U.K. culture and the theory of subcultures.
Course Code and Credits: COM 5410
Course Title: Gender in Film (3)
Course Description:
This course explores key concepts that have shaped the study of gender in film in the past 50 years. It considers different spectators’ viewing positions and analyzes how historical and social changes in the construction of masculinities and femininities have shaped specific film genres. A variety of issues related to sexuality, race/ethnicity and non-western representations are also considered as students are encouraged to study film texts closely to make their own readings based on the semiotics of the film and the ideology behind it..
Course Code and Credits: COM 6200
Course Title: New Media (3)
Course Description:
This course traces the historical development of new media, emphasizing the social, political and cultural context of new media technologies. It introduces students to a number of contemporary theoretical debates for understanding the role of new media in contemporary democracies and their impact on identity formation processes. Interfacing practical skills and critical thought, a number of key debates in digital culture are addressed through written texts and the investigation of Internet sites and electronic texts.
Course Code and Credits: COM 6400
Course Title: Fashion And Media (3)
Course Description:
This course traces the multiple connections between the fashion and media industries. It emphasizes the material realities, pragmatic and creative dynamisms, fantasy components, and essential visuality of fashion. It also highlights how cities in general function as creative agencies for fermenting style and fashion ideas and attitudes. Prerequisite:SCL 5200 or COM 5200. Study Abroad students may take this course with the permission of the Richmond faculty advisors.

FASHION
Course Code and Credits: COM 6400
Course Title: Fashion And Media (3)
Course Description:
This course traces the multiple connections between the fashion and media industries. It emphasizes the material realities, pragmatic and creative dynamisms, fantasy components, and essential visuality of fashion. It also highlights how cities in general function as creative agencies for fermenting style and fashion ideas and attitudes. Prerequisite:SCL 5200 or COM 5200. Study Abroad students may take this course with the permission of the Richmond faculty advisors.
Course Code and Credits: MKT 5405
Course Title: Fashion Marketing and Retail (3)
Course Description:
This course covers the fundamentals of fashion and the basic principles that govern all fashion movement and change. It examines the history, development, organization and operation of merchandising and marketing activities, trends in industries engaged in producing fashion, purchasing of fashion merchandise, foreign and domestic markets, and the distribution and promotion of fashion.

FILM
Course Code and Credits: FLM 5200
Course Title: Mainstream Cinema: Studies In Genre (3)
Course Description:
This course investigates the development of genre films over a historical period. Students examine issues critical to genre studies, which can include iconography, key themes, authorship and stardom. Specifically, through a study of film criticism and theory, students examine distinct genres from the 1920s to the present. The course also explores the idea that genre films necessarily retain basic similarities to reflect cultural concerns and to keep audience interest. In addition, the course provides an opportunity for students to examine and compare the perspectives of Hollywood and non-Hollywood genre films. Study abroad students may take this course with the permission of the instructor.
Course Code and Credits: FLM 6230
Course Title: International Cinema (3)
Course Description:
This course examines global cinema while considering the extent to which cultural, political, and historical contexts have influenced the form and grammar of film during the last century. The overall focus of the course is broad, ranging across more than eight decades and many different countries; it aims to study a variety of approaches to and theories of narrative cinema. During the semester, many international film “movements” are covered, which can include the French New Wave, the Chinese Sixth Generation, and Italian Neo-Realism. In addition, the representations of non- Western cultures from an “insider” and a “Hollywood” perspective are compared.

LITERATURE
Course Code and Credits: ENG 5195
Course Title: Creative Writing (3)
Course Description:
In this writer’s workshop students submit examples of their work for critical consideration by the instructor and other members of the class. Impetus is given to the writing tasks through the close reading and discussion of a selection of writing from different genres and cultures. Students identify aspects of poets’ and fictionists’ craft and develop an awareness of narrative structure with which to shape their own projects through a feedback-driven revision process. By the end of the semester, each student will have produced a collection of finished poems and pieces of short fiction.
Course Code and Credits: LIT 5100
Course Title: Travel Writing (3)
Course Description:
The course exposes students to the scope and the power of modern travel writing. It endeavors to provide an intellectual framework for the understanding and analysis of this genre and introduces students to important critical texts. Students explore works taken mostly from within the parameters of literature, including fiction, non-fiction and poetry. Time is also spent on journalism, new media writing and film. Critical and theoretical responses to travel writing are explored, and an integral part of the students’ responses to the works they encounter will be the production of their own creative writing.
Course Code and Credits: LIT 5405
Course Title: British Fantasy Writing (3)
Course Description:
This course will explore the vibrant genre tradition of fantastic and non-realist writing using a range of critical approaches. The first half of the course will survey some of the major texts on which modern Fantasy literature draws, including Beowulf, Arthurian texts and selections from works by Shakespeare, Milton, Jane Austen and Lewis Carroll. The second half of the course will focus more intensively on a few major fantasies from the past 120 years and their filmed adaptations, including works by Bram Stoker, J.R.R. Tolkien, and J.K. Rowling, and will look at how these texts and their filmic counterparts repurpose and revision older ideas for novel purposes.

HISTORY
Course Code and Credits: HST 5400
Course Title: History of London (3)
Course Description:
This course surveys the history of London from its early prehistoric origins to the modern cosmopolitan metropolis that it is today. The students will explore the social, political, and architectural development of this urban center throughout the ages. Together with lectures, the students will visit important sites throughout the city that are perfect examples of the development of London. Note: Visits require some travel and entrance costs.
Course Code and Credits: HST 5405
Course Title: U.S. and U.K. Comparative History (3)
Course Description:
Focuses on shared themes from the 1880s to the present day, using a variety of approaches to enable students from different disciplines to participate in the course. Issues around popular culture, gender and ethnicity will be looked at, as well as peoples’ responses to major events like the Depression and wars. Concepts from economic history will be used to analyze the booms and slumps that have occurred and the changes to the U.S./U.K. that have taken place as a result. The decline of Britain as a world power and the parallel rise of the U.S. will be studied, and this will help put into context the current debates on the post-Cold War world order and globalization.

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND POLITICS
Course Code and Credits: INR 5100
Course Title: Critical Globalization Studies (3)
Course Description:
TThis interdisciplinary course addresses the vitally important and complex phenomenon of contemporary globalization. The concept of globalization and the history of this phenomenon are interrogated. Political, social, economic and cultural aspects of globalization are discussed, and core themes of globalization debates are addressed, such as convergence, nationalism, and inequality. A range of global actors, agents and institutions are critically engaged with.
Course Code and Credits: PLT 5205
Course Title: British Politics: Inside Parliament (3)
Course Description:
This course will introduce students to the main political institutions in the United Kingdom (the monarchy, the executive, parliament, political parties and electoral systems) and to important debates in contemporary British society, such as constitutional reform, Britain’s relations with Europe, the power of the media, gender debates and multiculturalism. The class combines theoretical and empirical approaches. Classes are supplemented by 10 sessions in the House of Commons with a Member of Parliament. Prerequisites: PLT 3100 or PLT 3105 or HST 3100 or HST 3105 or permission of instructor.

PSYCHOLOGY
Course Code and Credits: PSY 5415
Course Title: Psychology and Cinema (3)
Course Description:
This course examines psychological approaches to understanding films. Beginning with classical psychoanalytic interpretations of contemporary films, the course will evaluate the relevance of Freud’s work on the uncanny, voyeurism, repetition compulsion and trauma. Students will also be introduced to Barthes’ influential semiotic work on narrative codes and their use in the film industry, as well as Laura Mulvey’s seminal feminist critique of Hollywood. Of special interest is the cinema’s potential, as an art form, to capture contemporary psychological processes such as individuation, the fear of fragmentation and the search for a narrative identity. There is a special emphasis on Jungian approaches to film, the Symbolic cinema, critical analyses of narrative structures, and the application of existential-phenomenological categories of thought to reading films. The course is run as a seminar, so students are expected to read widely and participate with interest.

RELIGION
Course Code and Credits: RLG 5100
Course Title: Comparative World Religions (3)
Course Description:
This course explores the monotheistic religions of the Near East (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam), those of India and the Far East (Hinduism, Buddhism, and Taoism) and the ‘new-age’ faiths. The history and practice of each is studied. Special emphasis is laid on the philosophical and psychological basis of each religion and common themes such as the self, suffering, free will and ethics. Primary and secondary sources are studied along with an examination of methodology in comparative religion.

SOCIOLOGY
Course Code and Credits: SCL 5105
Course Title: Religion, Magic and Witchcraft (3)
Course Description:
This course focuses on sociological and anthropological perspectives on religious practice and experience. Classical theorists Marx, Weber and Durkheim will be examined. Notions of magic, witchcraft and the supernatural will be addressed in relation to myth and symbolism. ‘New Age’ spirituality will be analyzed in relation to altered states of consciousness and counterculture and alternative versions of ‘faith’.

THEATER ARTS
Course Code and Credits: THR 5210
Course Title: Acting Skills (3)
Course Description:
An intermediate performance skills course that focuses on developing the voice and body through group work consisting of improvisational exercises, the use of stage space, basic blocking, and the interpretation of character and text. Group interaction is an important aspect of this course.
Course Code and Credits: THR 5405/THR5410
Course Title: Shakespeare and His World I fall only (3)/ II spring only (3)
Course Description:
This course provides historical and theoretical contexts to Shakespeare’s plays and approaches them with a variety of different critical methods. Shakespeare in performance is an integral part of the course and students are expected to see productions of most texts studied. An additional fee is required for outside trips.

Other Courses

Richmond offers a wide variety of courses, many more than can be listed here. For a full list of courses available in your chosen semester please visit the Richmond website www.richmond.ac.uk. You can also use the website to ensure that you have the required prerequisites or their equivalents.

ART, DESIGN AND MEDIA
Course Code and Credits: ADM 5410
Course Title: Exploring Paint Media (3)
Course Description:
Combines study of pigments and various water, acrylic, and oilbased media, their uses and technical characteristics with studies of style, composition, color theory and visual appearance. Students undertake a number of practical projects designed to enable them to explore aspects of theory and the potentialities of paint and color, both as ends in themselves and as components integrated into work in other media. Discussion and the sharing of ideas and perceptions are an important part of this course. A studio fee is levied on this course.
Course Code and Credits: ADM 6400
Course Title: Drawing on London (3)
Course Description:
This course is designed to give students a deeper understanding of the role of drawing as an investigative process as well as an expressive means of communication. Drawing is used as a basic exploratory tool to examine London as the site for both subject – in particular, the River Thames - and as a research resource for the practice of drawing, especially the specialist departments at The Victoria and Albert and the British Museum. The course is divided between working in the studio and on location in London. The sketchbook is an essential aspect of the course in helping students to document the city, stimulate and develop ideas and as a reminder that drawing is a portable medium. A studio fee is levied on this course.
Course Code and Credits: ADM 6405
Course Title: Printmaking Workshop (3)
Course Description:
Intended for students who have acquired graphic skills in drawing, illustration, and computer graphics or who have experience of photographic printing. It aims not so much to give in-depth knowledge of particular printmaking processes as to stimulate a creative response to all areas of image making that involve printing. The course is practical in nature, although museum and gallery study, as well as some reading, is assigned relating to the techniques that are explored in class. A studio fee is levied on this course.
Course Code and Credits: ADM 6430
Course Title: Communication Design: Type (3)
Course Description:
This course focuses on the theory and practice of communication design, with emphasis on type-based solutions. It introduces students to the concept of graphic design as a social activity and projects include book design, grid systems and poster design. The course has an important theoretical component which includes visual culture and graphic design criticism.
Course Code and Credits: ADM 6435
Course Title: Web Design (3)
Course Description:
The course provides students with the core foundations and practical skills required to design a fully functional and interactive website. It offers a snapshot of the brief history and current status of the medium, and practitioners working within it. Web Design focuses on two main areas: preparation and design of a website, followed by the design/build ready for online publication. It is ideal for students who want to showcase a portfolio of work on the web.
Course Code and Credits: ADM 6440
Course Title: Communication Design: Image (3)
Course Description:
This course focuses on the study and application of image within the practice of communication design. Typical works include identity and logo design, pictograms/signage and poster design. The course has an important theoretical component which includes semiotics, visual culture and theory of image design..
Course Code and Credits: ADM 6445
Course Title: From Script to Screen (3)
Course Description:
From Script to Screen explores the creative and practical aspects of script writing and advanced video production. The course is intended for students who have experience of video production and want to expand their knowledge and skills. Students will create and produce a video, starting from the inception of the idea through to the realization of the idea as a finished film to be screened at the end of the course. Focusing on the journey from having an idea for a film through to writing a high spec script, students will learn how drama is represented in the written form, analyze and explore scripts from existing films and other forms of drama, and learn more about the film and T.V. industry and the place of screenwriting in it. In doing so, students have the opportunity to try the different ‘parts’ of film-making, from the creative and theoretical – writing, story boarding, workshopping, casting and directing, to the technical – camera operation, sound recording and video editing. Prerequisite: ADM 5200 or permission of the instructor. Judgement will be made on the basis of submission on video or DVD of a video/film made by the applicant. Can be in any genre, but must demonstrate the ability to use a video camera and basic skills in sound recording and editing. A studio fee is levied on this course.
Course Code and Credits: ADM 6450
Course Title: Animation and Motion (3)
Course Description:
Intended for students who want to create moving image work within an art and design studio environment. The course provides a foundation in animation practice, its history and theory, enabling progress in the further fields of time-based media, motion graphics and video art. A major focus of the course is practical; students will learn and develop key skills in both digital and hands-on animation production methods.

ART HISTORY
Course Code and Credits: AVC 5400
Course Title: British Art and Architecture (3)
Course Description:
Considers British painting, sculpture, architecture, and interior design, in their cultural, social and political contexts. Students make regular visits to buildings, museums, with their rich intercultural collections, to discuss works on site.
Course Code and Credits: ARH 5405
Course Title: The Renaissance: New Perspectives (3)
Course Description:
This course challenges the common assumption that the Renaissance is a typically Italian phenomenon, paying particular attention to Northern Europe during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, with special reference to England, France, Germany and Flanders. Students are introduced to issues related to the Northern European interplay between political agendas, social structures and religious ideologies on the one hand, and visual art on the other. The course includes sustained engagement with the rich intercultural collections of museums and galleries in London.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS
Course Code and Credits: ECN 5105
Course Title: Economic Problems of Developing Countries (3)
Course Description:
This course discusses questions such as: Why does the level of economic prosperity vary between countries? How is the difference itself to be measured? What is the range of measures available to improve the lives of the world’s poorest inhabitants? What role can organizations such as the IMF and the World Bank take in this process? In this course you will be exposed to a range of material designed to encourage you to link theory to the practical implications faced by policy makers and the policy choices they make.
Course Code and Credits: FNN 5205
Course Title: Principles of Investment (3)
Course Description:
Focusing on financial investment, the course familiarizes the student with a range of financial instruments and capital market operations, including new issues, trading, and the role of financial intermediaries in the investment market. Investment companies are investigated. Fundamentals of portfolio theory are introduced and applied to investment management. Valuation of fixed-income securities, equity instruments, and common stock is discussed on the basis of modern capital market theory. The course introduces financial derivatives, including options, futures, forward rate agreements, and interest rate swaps, and relates the use of derivatives to fixed-income investment, portfolio analysis, and interest rate risk management.
Course Code and Credits: FNN 6200
Course Title: Money and Banking (3)
Course Description:
This course focuses on the role of money and other financial instruments within the macro economy. The operations and behavior of commercial banks and other financial institutions is examined from a strategic viewpoint, along with the role of central banks and regulators. Some of the controversies about the effectiveness of regulatory and monetary policies are also discussed.
Course Code and Credits: FNN 6410
Course Title: International Finance (3)
Course Description:
Taking a global perspective, the course focuses on the basics of multinational financial management from an international finance perspective. An understanding of multinational finance begins with a mastery of the principles of exchange rates—how they are determined, how they affect the prices of goods and services, and their relationship to interest rates. The course also covers foreign exchange markets, multinational accounting, foreign exchange risk, strategies and tools for managing exchange rate exposure, import and export finance, and multinational financial management.
Course Code and Credits: INB 6200
Course Title: Country Risk Analysis (3)
Course Description:
This course provides students with an overview of the history, methods, strengths, and limitations of economic and political risk forecasting. Economics and political risk forecasting is defined as a package of social science concepts and methods used by governments and multinational businesses to analyze the future economic and political environments in which they operate. A seminar format with extensive student participation is used.
Course Code and Credits: INB 6215
Course Title: Managing the Multinational Corporation (3)
Course Description:
This is a final course for International Business students. It provides a managerial perspective into managing the structure and operations of multinational corporations (MNCs) in the global business environment. Major managerial issues are studied from the MNC’s perspective and the problems of planning and executing business strategies on a global scale are analyzed. A project in International Business is required.
Course Code and Credits: MGT 5410
Course Title: Human Resource Management (3)
Course Description:
This course combines elements of different disciplines ranging from industrial relations, social psychology, personnel management, motivation, recruitment and selection, leadership, communication, manpower planning, aspects of training and development and related processes. It is appropriate for students seeking to follow a career in Human Resource Management or in other areas of functional management.
Course Code and Credits: MKT 6200
Course Title: Advertising Management (3)
Course Description:
The course provides an in depth study and application of advertising and its role in marketing strategies. Topics include: identification of relevant data to analyze the marketing situation; development of product/brand positioning; marketing and advertising objectives and strategies; creative strategy; media planning and evaluation; consumer motivation and advertising appeals; consumer buying behavior; promotional communication opportunity analysis, branding and corporate image; target audiences; print and broadcast production; budgeting.
Course Code and Credits: MKT 6210
Course Title: Distribution and Retailing Management (3)
Course Description:
The course addresses the roles and processes of physical distribution, channel management, and retailing. Students study current practices in retail marketing strategy and its relevance to branding and positioning strategies (the store concepts, experiential marketing) the retail marketing mix decisions, the distribution channel function, and management. The relationship between the manufacturer and the end-user is analyzed and the activities and functions of channels intermediaries are studied for their impact on market planning. Channels design and developments in contemporary retailing methods are covered, with the emphasis on retail store location, operations, and the influence of technology on distribution.
Course Code and Credits: MKT 6215
Course Title: Global Marketing Management (3)
Course Description:
Provides an insight into the strategic problems and opportunities companies face as they move from local to multinational to global markets. The problems and issues encountered in market entry are highlighted and standardization, contextualization and adaptation strategies are assessed for their appropriateness to new market situations. Students will be expected to understand and be able to implement an environmental approach to strategic international marketing planning.

COMMUNICATIONS AND LITERATURE
Course Code and Credits: COM 5120
Course Title: Adaptations: Literature And Cinema (3)
Course Description:
This course deals with adaptations from literary texts, in the broad sense – novels, plays and comic books – to cinema and television. It engages with issues around the transition from one medium to another, debating questions of authorship and the relative advantages of different forms. Adaptations are discussed in terms of their historical and cultural contexts, and ‘faithful’ versions contrasted with ‘free’ adaptations which retain the tone and spirit of the original while deviating from the letter of the text.
Course Code and Credits: COM 5210
Course Title: Writing for Marketing and Business (3)
Course Description:
This course examines the theory and practice of writing for marketing and business communications. Topics include: analyzing the target audience, considering the medium and the format, writing for product branding, evaluating successful writing, and writing promotional materials in business and not-for-profit sectors. Students will analyze real world examples of effective marketing and business communications and their assignments will reflect contemporary standards in these practices. Students will have a variety of assignments where they will try their hand at writing an advertising copy and slogan, a persuasive business proposal, and effective press materials.
Course Code and Credits: COM 6410
Course Title: International Cinema (3)
Course Description:
This course examines global cinema while considering the extent to which cultural, political, and historical contexts have influenced the form and grammar of film during the last century. The overall focus of the course is broad, ranging across more than eight decades and many different countries; it aims to study a variety of approaches to and theories of narrative cinema. During the semester, many international film “movements” are covered, which can include the French New Wave, the Chinese Sixth Generation, and Italian Neo-Realism. In addition, the representations of non- Western cultures from an “insider” and a “Hollywood” perspective are compared. Study Abroad students may take this course with the permission of the instructor.
Course Code and Credits: JRN 6205
Course Title: Media Ethics (3)
Course Description:
Media professionals, and in particular journalists, have a special role in democracies. This course examines the main legal and ethical issues which journalists of the digital age encounter in their working lives. Thus, the course will focus on the concepts of libel and defamation, copyright law, the public sphere, media ownership, objectivity and neutrality, freedom of the press, censorship, codes of conduct for journalists, privacy and public interest, reporting restrictions and national interest, propaganda, gender issues, and reporting in a multicultural society.
Course Code and Credits: LIT 5400
Course Title: Contemporary London Literature (3)
Course Description:
London has become the focus of ‘ferocious imaginative energy’ since the rise of Thatcherism in the 1980s. Beginning with an overview of London’s historical myths and fictions, this class exposes students to a variety of writers committed to exploring the many lives of a city undergoing complex transformations. From post-modern obsessions to multicultural landscapes and post 9/11 anxieties, different voices and visions, provide insights into our understanding of contemporary London.

HISTORY
Course Code and Credits: HST 5100
Course Title: Cultures Of Imperial Power (3)
Course Description:
This course examines the causes and consequences of empires throughout history from a broad range of comparative perspectives, including the economic, political, social and (by way of post-colonial theory) the cultural. It investigates why empires are historically significant, how and why they rise and fall, whether they are good or bad, how they are defined, and how they can be resisted. The subject matter ranges from the earliest land superpowers of the ancient world to the ‘New Rome’ - the United States. It examines the question as to whether or not all history is essentially a history of empire, with the legacies of this imperial past (if not some of the empires themselves) still alive and well despite decolonization. Where possible the course will make use of museums and collections within London.
Course Code and Credits: HST 5105
Course Title: Rise Of The Right: History of Fascisms (3)
Course Description:
This course is intended to be a comparative study of various forms of fascisms from the end of the nineteenth century through to the modern period. It explores the fundamental interpretative questions concerning the nature of fascism. This is followed by a study of the historical origins of fascism as well as an examination of late nineteenth/early twentieth century proto-fascist movements. The focus then moves to the individual fascist movements themselves, including Italy (where the fascist prototype evolved), Germany (where it was taken to its extreme), and Spain (where a variant persisted until 1975). The course concludes with a discussion about the ‘return’ of fascism, examining Neo-Nazi violence, immigration, ‘ethnic cleansing’ and the return of fascism under ‘other names’. The course is intended to be interactive with guest speakers, class visits, films, and regular seminar sessions.
Course Code and Credits: HST 5110
Course Title: Nationalism And Conflict (3)
Course Description:
This course is intended to be a comparative study of the various forms of nationalism, dictatorship and democracy that evolved and emerged across Central/Eastern Europe (CEE) during the ‘short’ twentieth century (1914-1990). It seeks to identify how CEE has been defined and how it came to take its present form. The main focus of this course will be on the various ideological currents that have shaped the region’s history – in particular nationalism, democracy and Communism. In addition, it will explore the conflicting arguments and different historical interpretations with regard to the key events of the period, including the development of nationalism, the emergence of fascism and Communism, the causes and courses of the two world wars and the Cold War, and finally, the causes behind the ‘reunification’ of Europe after 1989.
Course Code and Credits: HST 6205
Course Title: Pictures of Power: History, Image and Propaganda (3)
Course Description:
The course aims to introduce students, by way of specific casestudies ranging from the ancient world to the modern day, to innovative methods of studying the past that utilize popular forms of visual culture and propaganda. While recognizing the complexity of the propaganda process and the various influences that form and shape images, the course will focus on the historical relationship between propaganda (in architecture, cartoons, film, painting, pamphlets, photography, posters, sculpture, and television) and politics. The focus on the theme of propaganda and its relationship with various forms of media through the ages allows for the opportunity to compare and contrast particular case-studies over time and geographical space and therefore to distinguish elements of continuity and change, which will help students to ‘read’ historic images critically, both as vehicles for understanding the past and in order to identify the relationship between propaganda and power. Prerequisites: HST 3100 or HST 3105 or HST 4100 or HST 4105 or HST 4110 or COM 5100 or permission of instructor.
Course Code and Credits: HST 6400
Course Title: Island To Empire: British History Since 1800 (3)
Course Description:
Surveys the history of modern Britain during its formative period of industrialization and empire building. An agrarian society ruled by a powerful aristocracy made way, not without moments of crisis, for an industrial society with a democratic franchise and organized political parties. The interaction between the old order and the new provides this course with its basic theme.

INTERNATIONAL JOURNALISM AND MEDIA
Course Code and Credits: JRN 5200
Course Title: Feature Writing (3)
Course Description:
This course focuses in consolidating and developing journalistic writing skills. Particular attention is given to the development of different writing styles (hard news and features for newspapers and magazines) and genres (reportage, color piece, service feature, human interest, reviews and profiles). Students are expected to be familiar with basic reporting skills as all writing will be based on independent reporting. The emphasis of this course is on developing independent writing skills.
Course Code and Credits: JRN 5400
Course Title: Arts and Entertainment Journalism (3)
Course Description:
Many young journalists dream of writing about the things that consume so much of their time – music, film, theater, showbusiness and the arts. This course will give them the basic tools to do the job. It will outline the essential framework of criticism and the responsibilities and ethics of those who write it, and it will also provide context to help students understand that what they watch, read and listen to now is directly connected to everything that has gone on in the past. In other words, to write with authority about film they must know something about the great directors of earlier cinema whose influence is so readily acknowledged by today’s film makers. Similarly, they need to know that the popular music they listen to now can trace its roots back to everything from bluegrass to The Beatles, and that it’s possible to draw a straight line between the 17th century art of Claude Lorraine via Turner, Monet and Jackson Pollock to Damien Hirst and the Britart movement of the new millennium.
Course Code and Credits: JRN 6205
Course Title: Media Ethics (3)
Course Description:
Media professionals, and in particular journalists, have a special role in democracies. This course examines the main legal and ethical issues which journalists of the digital age encounter in their working lives. Thus, the course will focus on the concepts of libel and defamation, copyright law, the public sphere, media ownership, objectivity and neutrality, freedom of the press, censorship, codes of conduct for journalists, privacy and public interest, reporting restrictions and national interest, propaganda, gender issues, and reporting in a multicultural society.

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, POLITICS AND PHILOSOPHY
Course Code and Credits: INR 5400
Course Title: U.S. Grand Strategy (3)
Course Description:
This course examines the major issues that underlie the development of United States’ foreign policy. The course considers the theoretical and actual implementation of foreign policy, firstly by examining the constitutionally mandated practitioners of such policy and secondly by exploring the execution of policy in a series of case studies covering the latter half of the Twentieth Century and early Twenty-First Century. Individuals, structures and theories are examined and explained in a course designed to convey the complexities that contribute to the formulation of U.S. Grand Strategy.
Course Code and Credits: INR 6405
Course Title: International Human Rights (3)
Course Description:
This course will cover the evolution of international human rights and of the various regional and international treaties and institutions designed for their protection. It will interrogate the fundamental tension between state sovereignty and individual rights, guaranteed by international law. It will further examine the historic and theoretical foundations of the idea of human rights in various civilizations and cultures, evaluate their legacy within western and non-western traditions, and examine their meaning and relevance in thinking about international human rights in contemporary world politics. The class principally draws on the theories and methodological approaches of the following disciplines: Sociology, International Law and International Relations .The course will address the classic debate regarding the universality of international human rights. Students will have an opportunity to critically evaluate a number of specific human rights regimes as illustration of the complex politics of contemporary human rights. The course further evaluates the pressures that developments in the broader field of global politics place on the protection of human rights.
Course Code and Credits: INR 6410
Course Title: Diplomatic Studies (3)
Course Description:
This course offers an overview of the history and practice of contemporary diplomacy. It begins with analysis of what a modern diplomat currently does, both at home and abroad, set within the context of diplomatic history and theory. The normal practice of diplomacy and the various techniques of international negotiation will be addressed by using both historical and contemporary examples. It will familiarize students with the activities of a modern diplomat within a wider historical and theoretical context.
Course Code and Credits: INR 6415
Course Title: Foreign Policy Analysis (3)
Course Description:
Foreign Policy Analysis considers the manner in which a state arrives at its foreign policy decisions. It is, therefore, characterized by a focus on the roles of individuals in the decision-making process. The course considers the important interaction between international and domestic politics and the impact that the latter has on the implementation of foreign policy. The course addresses the manner in which individuals devise and implement policy on an international stage through a variety of comparative and case study driven approaches.
Course Code and Credits: PLT 5405
Course Title: The EU in New International System (3)
Course Description:
Historical beginnings of the European Union, its institutions and its economic performance. The Single European Act, the European Monetary System, social, political and economic aspects of integration and foreign policy cooperation.
Course Code and Credits: PLT 5415
Course Title: Politics Of Sub-Saharan Africa (3)
Course Description:
Follows the attempt to promote stability, economic development, and democratic systems of government in sub-Saharan Africa, and engages with the core issue of the relationship between the state, civil society, and external interests in the region. The many social, political, economic and security problems that hamper the development project are addressed, by following a historical trajectory from the colonial era through to modern times.
Course Code and Credits: PLT 5425
Course Title: Modern China (3)
Course Description:
Examines aspects of China’s history such as the Opium Wars, the downfall of the Empire in 1911, the growth of nationalism and the ensuing civil war, the rise and decline of Maoism and the role of China in world politics, with particular reference to its increasing economic importance.
Course Code and Credits: PLT 6205
Course Title: Policy-Making in a Globalized World (3)
Course Description:
This course investigates the process of policy-making in modern states. It explores how in the new globalized world governments “import” and “borrow” policy ideas from each other, while analyzing how the different actors – states, bureaucrats, think-tanks, policy-networks, lobby groups, citizens, etc – participate and influence the policy-making process. Through role-play activities (such as writing a political manifesto, advising a President on a foreignpolicy issue, or enacting a policy-network in the policy process) students will understand the complexities of policy-making and the challenges that the modern state faces in the era of globalization.

PSYCHOLOGY
Course Code and Credits: PSY 5200
Course Title: Theories Of Personality (3)
Course Description:
The purpose of this course is to increase students’ awareness of the variety of theoretical viewpoints that exist regarding the nature of human personality and the factors that influence human behavior. We will examine the different theoretical viewpoints in terms of what they may have to say about personality structure and its development, emotion, motivation, cognition, the development of psychopathology, and clinical applications for personality change. Students will also be asked to evaluate the prominent theoretical perspectives critically and to consider cultural variations in personality constructs. It is hoped that students will be able to incorporate the most useful aspects of each approach and synthesize them to develop their own perspective regarding the nature of human personality development and functioning.
Course Code and Credits: PSY 5405
Course Title: Psychopathology (3)
Course Description:
Combines lectures, case studies, and audiovisual sessions to introduce students to the field of clinical psychology, psychiatry, and mental health work. An examination of the symptoms and treatment options for a range of mental and emotional disorders, including anxiety, depression, mania, and the schizophrenias, raising a number of important issues for discussion. These include: cultural variations in the definition and diagnosis of disordered states; the social psychological problems of the move from asylums to community care; and criticisms of the medical model of abnormality.
Course Code and Credits: PSY 5415
Course Title: Psychology and Cinema (3)
Course Description:
This course examines psychological approaches to understanding films. Beginning with classical psychoanalytic interpretations of contemporary films, the course will evaluate the relevance of Freud’s work on the uncanny, voyeurism, repetition compulsion and trauma. Students will also be introduced to Barthes’ influential semiotic work on narrative codes and their use in the film industry, as well as Laura Mulvey’s seminal feminist critique of Hollywood. Of special interest is the cinema’s potential, as an art form, to capture contemporary psychological processes such as individuation, the fear of fragmentation and the search for a narrative identity. There is a special emphasis on Jungian approaches to film, the Symbolic cinema, critical analyses of narrative structures, and the application of existential-phenomenological categories of thought to reading films. The course is run as a seminar, so students are expected to read widely and participate with interest. Prerequisite: PSY 3100.
Course Code and Credits: PSY 5430
Course Title: Psychology of Education (3)
Course Description:
The aim of this course is to investigate the applications of psychology in educational settings. Students will have the opportunity to gain an understanding of the ways psychology theories and research have influenced our understanding of child learning and teaching. Furthermore, this course investigates the impact of certain psychosocial factors on children’s educational development, including peer relations, the role of adults, teacher-pupil interactions and barriers to learning. This course provides a rich learning opportunity for students who want to study Educational Psychology on a postgraduate level or for students who wish to pursue a career in teaching.
Course Code and Credits: PSY 6210
Course Title: Cognitive Science (3)
Course Description:
Cognitive science is an exciting interdisciplinary approach to the mind that draws on research from a variety of disciplines, including philosophy, computer science, linguistics, neuroscience, and psychology. The resulting theories and data have also exerted a profound influence on how philosophers approach fundamental issues about the nature of the mind. This course focuses on such issues, including: Is the mind a computer? How much of the mind is innate and how much is learned? Is the mind a unitary general purpose mechanism, or is it divided into specialized subsystems or courses? How do we represent the world in thought? Are human beings rational?
Course Code and Credits: PSY 6415
Course Title: Counseling Theory and Practice I (3)
Course Description:
This course combines theoretical approaches to counseling with practical and experiential work. Students are introduced to an integrative, multi-cultural approach to counseling, which draws on a wide-range of theoretical perspectives, including psychoanalytic, psychodynamic, existential, and Gestalt approaches. Selected issues are discussed via case examples and videos, and guest lectures from visiting professionals.
Course Code and Credits: PSY 6430
Course Title: Psychology of Happiness and Wellbeing (3)
Course Description:
Positive psychologists argue that traditional psychology has tended to focus on dysfunction and unhappiness and that balance needs to be restored by research into what makes life go well. This course focuses on the science of happiness and wellbeing, integrating findings from Positive Psychology studies and theories. During this course, students will critically evaluate the teaching of Positive Psychology as a means of enhancing happiness and understand the difference between weaknesses and strengths, and how positive psychology emphasizes the latter in contrast to traditional psychology’s emphasis on the former. Students will appreciate some of the factors that lead to happiness and learn how to capitalise on these factors in order to capitalise on these factors in order to achieve lasting happiness, especially by getting to know their own strengths; students will also understand and use a variety of techniques and interventions designed to enhance happiness and wellbeing.

RELIGION
Course Code and Credits: HST 5205
Course Title: Rome and the East: Culture and Faith in late Antiquity (3)
Course Description:
The course covers the areas of the Roman and Sasanian Empires, their adjoining regions and that of their successor states from 200 AD until 800 AD. The course looks at religious ideas that were rooted in these societies, polythesisms, Xoroastrianism, Judaism and the newer religions of Christianity and Islam. Students will learn about different methods of critically analyzing the material cultures of these people including architecture, mosaics, texts, monuments, murals and the artefacts of both common and elite life. Links will be made from the ideological and cultural aspects of these societies to the political and economic systems in place around them. Historical debates will be explored about the nature of late antiquity and whether it can best be understood as a period of cross-cultural interaction or as a set of distinct changes in highly localized societies.

SERVICE LEARNING
Course Code and Credits: ISL 5000
Course Title: Service Learning and Active Citizenship (3)
Course Description:
The Service Learning and Active Citizenship course is a student community placement that aims to provide students from all disciplines and majors with the intellectual, professional, and personal skills that will enable them to function well in a culturally diverse community in London. In addition to the weeks of field work (typically 9-12 depending on the organization), the student will also produce a written journal of their experience which provides critical reflection (learning log), a ‘community action’ portfolio (analytical essay), and a final oral presentation. These assessments have been designed to help the student reflect on the skills they are learning and the benefits gained from the service learning experience, and also to help them determine if their current career goals are the correct fit for them. During the service learning course, the staff of the Internship Office and a faculty supervisor work closely with each student to ensure that the community placement is a successful one. This course requires a student visa obtained at the British Consulate before departure from the U.S.

SOCIOLOGY
Course Code and Credits: COM 5115
Course Title: Sociology of Culture and Sub Culture (3)
Course Description:
Introduces the field of cultural studies by examining various concepts of culture, the positions taken in cultural criticism, and the relationship between social and cultural transformation. Emphasis is placed on differences between U.S. and U.K. culture and the theory of subcultures. Prerequisite: SCL 3100.
Course Code and Credits: SCL 5400
Course Title: Modern Britain: A Social Analysis (3)
Course Description:
A general presentation of British society for students who arrive in the country and are keen to know about its way of life, patterns of thought, and socio-cultural background. This course also examines Britain’s changing status in the world and the effect this has had on socio-political attitudes and behavior.

THEATER ARTS
Course Code and Credits: THR 5100
Course Title: World Theater (3)
Course Description:
Provides an overview of the theater of European and non European countries. Mainly issue-driven writing is examined, especially drama as a reaction to oppression. This course identifies styles that are specific to certain cultures in an aim to identify cultural influences from one country to another. Students are encouraged to contribute insights from their own individual cultures..
Course Code and Credits: THR 5215
Course Title: Screen Acting Techniques (3)
Course Description:
Develops acting skills specifically relating to the camera - i.e., for film and television. In a series of practical workshops and lectures, students are introduced to the disciplines of acting for the camera, and discover the basic differences between acting for television and for film (as opposed to the theater) as well as various styles of performance. Students learn how to develop realistic, sincere, and believable performances. They also become practiced in dealing with the maintenance of performance under adverse technical conditions. Students gain experience in the rehearsal process, the development of a character, and shooting procedures. They are also given exercises in interviewing for screen work and screen testing.
Course Code and Credits: THR 6200
Course Title: Fire Over England (3)
Course Description:
Examines the classical traditions in British theater, as they are perceived today. Students look at a range of plays from the Renaissance tragedies of Christopher Marlowe, William Shakespeare and John Webster to the twentieth century tragedies of dramatists such as T. S. Eliot. Lectures concentrate on textual studies and criticism, and a number of theater visits are undertaken where possible, these are productions of plays taught on the course. Prerequisites: THR 4100.

Other Courses offered by Richmond

If you have not found the course you want, check the Richmond website, www.richmond.ac.uk. Richmond offers many other courses each semester that AIFS students can take, over 750 each year.

Please note that study abroad students are not permitted to take the independent study, senior project/senior essay, graduate level (classes starting with a 7xxx) or Foundations Program courses listed on the Richmond website.