AIFS Abroad

AIFS Study Abroad in London, England
Summer 2017
Course Descriptions

   

Courses are divided by session and then grouped by broad academic discipline. Class timetables are available in April 2017. Please see below for full course descriptions and prerequisites.

Art courses often meet in museums and galleries. Students incur some travel and entrance expenses, which are outlined in the syllabi.

A maximum of 14 students can register for each Art/Art History class. Students are registered in the order of the date their application is received.

3-Week Courses, Session A (May 22 - June 9)

Art History and Art, Design and Media
Course Code and Credits: ADM 3160A (3)
Course Title: Foundations in Photography
Course Description:
This course concentrates on developing the student’s visual intelligence via photography. Technically, students will learn to use digital Single Lens Reflex cameras and Photoshop for image workflow and editing. By looking at the work of a range of artists, students will be introduced to some of the theories that underpin photographic practice and consider photography’s place and role in contemporary culture. Throughout the course students make images which finally result in an edited portfolio of photographic prints.
Course Code and Credits: AVC 5200A (3)
Course Title: Museums and Galleries of London: The Cultures of Display
Course Description:
Considers the nature of museums and art galleries and their role and function in our society. Studies the workings of the art market, conservation, restoration, the investment potential of art and art world crime. Students visit many of the great London collections as part of this course. Suitable for students majoring in Art History or for those interested in careers in museum or gallery work. Visits require some travel and entrance costs.
Course Code and Credits: GEP 3160A (3)
Course Title: Creative Expression
Course Description:
This core course explores the ways we can interpret and appreciate different types of art across cultures. How can we make sense of an art installation that consists of a pile of stones on a gallery floor? How can we understand music and the creative expression behind it? Through examples from the fine arts, film, theatre, music and fashion, this class engages with broad themes concerning the value of artistic thinking and the role it plays in education, social relations, urbanism and the creative economy.

Business Administration and Economics
Course Code and Credits: ECN 5105A (3)
Course Title: Economic Problems of Developing Countries
Course Description:
This course discusses questions such as: Why does the level of economic prosperity vary between countries? How is the difference itself to be measured? What is the range of measures available to improve the lot of the world’s poorest inhabitants? What role can organizations such as the IMF and the World Bank take in this process? On this course you will be exposed to a range of material designed to encourage you to link theory to the practical implications faced by policy makers and the policy choices they make.
Course Code and Credits: MGT 5400A (3)
Course Title: Organizational Behavior
Course Description:
This course explores the structure and nature of organizations and the contribution that communication and human behavior makes to organizational performance. The course will address not only macro level issues relating to the environment and context within which organizations operate, but also the micro level influences of people as individuals and groups, their motivations and operating styles. The management of people for successful organizational performance will be emphasized by considering work environmental factors that facilitate or impede organizational success.
Course Code and Credits: MKT 5410A (3)
Course Title: Psychology of Fashion and Luxury Goods
Course Description:
Consumer psychology within the context of the consumption of fashion and luxury products and services is complex and is influenced by many factors. A thorough analysis and understanding of these factors allows organizations to plan effective marketing activities suitable to their target markets. This course enables students to understand the importance of consumer behavior in the process of marketing fashion and luxury goods and services.

History
Course Code and Credits: HST 5425A (3)
Course Title: Historical London
Course Description:
From the creation of Londinium by the Romans to the great modern metropolis, this course traces the growth and the changing functions, institutions and architecture of London. Readings from contemporary writers, describing the London they knew and visits to selected monuments are an integral part of this course. Visits require some travel and entrance costs.
Course Code and Credits: HST 5405A (3)
Course Title: U.S. and U.K. Comparative History
Course Description:
Focuses on shared themes from the 1880s to the present day, using a variety of approaches to enable students from different disciplines to participate in the course. Examines issues around popular culture, gender and ethnicity, as well as peoples’ responses to major events like the Depression and wars. Concepts from economic history are used to analyze booms and slumps, along with the resulting changes to both the U.S. and the U.K. The decline of Britain as a world power and the parallel rise of the U.S. is studied, putting into context the current debates on the post Cold War world order and globalization.

Literature and Communications
Course Code and Credits: COM 6400A (3)
Course Title: Fashion and Media
Course Description:
This course traces the multiple connections between the fashion and media industries. It emphasizes the material realities, pragmatic and creative dynamisms, fantasy components, and essential visuality of fashion. It also highlights how London and cities in general function as creative agencies for fermenting style and fashion ideas and attitudes.

Psychology
Course Code and Credits: PSY 4215A (3)
Course Title: Biological Basis of Human Behavior
Course Description:
Exposes students to the relationship between biology and behavior. Students are expected to assess critically the extent to which biological explanations can be used to understand or explain human behavior. Topics covered are: motivational behavior; social behavior; sleep; perception; learning and memory. Special discussion topics include: sexual behavior; eating disorders; emotions and consciousness. In addition, the course looks at perceptual and memory disorders.

Social Sciences/International Relations
Course Code and Credits: RLG 5100A (3)
Course Title: Comparative World Religions
Course Description:
Explores the monotheistic religions of the Near East (Judaism, Christianity and Islam), those of India and the Far East (Hinduism, Buddhism and Taoism) and the “new age” faiths. The history and practice of each is studied. Special emphasis is laid on the philosophical and psychological basis of each religion and common themes such as the “self” and suffering.

Session B (June 12 – June 30)

Art History and Art, Design and Media
Course Code and Credits: ADM 3160B (3)
Course Title: Foundations in Photography
Course Description:
This course concentrates on developing the student’s visual intelligence via photography. Technically, students will learn to use digital Single Lens Reflex cameras and Photoshop for image workflow and editing. By looking at the work of a range of artists, students will be introduced to some of the theories that underpin photographic practice and consider photography’s place and role in contemporary culture. Throughout the course students make images which finally result in an edited portfolio of photographic prints.
Course Code and Credits: AVC 5200B (3)
Course Title: Museums and Galleries of London: The Cultures of Display
Course Description:
Considers the nature of museums and art galleries and their role and function in our society. Studies the workings of the art market, conservation, restoration, the investment potential of art and art world crime. Students visit many of the great London collections as part of this course. Suitable for students majoring in Art History or for those interested in careers in museum or gallery work. Visits require some travel and entrance costs.

Business Administration and Economics
Course Code and Credits: GEP 3120B (3)
Course Title: Quantitative Reasoning
Course Description:
This core course develops an understanding of basic mathematical concepts and their presence in a range of contexts and applications. Is it possible to use mathematics to predict the next new trends in music? How do you calculate the impact of an oil spill? Topics such as interest rates, interpreting graphs, probabilities associated with decision making and mathematics in the environment and the creative arts will be covered.
Course Code and Credits: MKT 6220B (3)
Course Title: Digital Marketing and Social Media
Course Description:
Provides students with an insight into the techniques and processes involved in creating and maintaining a marketing presence on the Internet. New technologies have created some radical changes in the way companies reach their markets. Students have the opportunity to learn about electronic commerce in action; the interplay between the technology and marketing applications; the changing scope and uses of the Internet; and current management issues facing businesses attempting to use the World Wide Web.

History
Course Code and Credits: HST 5425B (3)
Course Title: Historical London
Course Description:
From the creation of Londinium by the Romans to the great modern metropolis, this course traces the growth and the changing functions, institutions and architecture of London. Readings from contemporary writers, describing the London they knew and visits to selected monuments are an integral part of this course. Visits require some travel and entrance costs.

Literature and Communications
Course Code and Credits: COM 5218B (3)
Course Title: Celebrity and Fan Culture
Course Description:
Charts the development and critical context of contemporary celebrity and fan cultures. Outlines key theoretical approaches. Explores the topic through a variety of media, from artists like Andy Warhol, Lady Gaga, Eminem, and Alison Jackson, to fanfic and other fan culture artifacts. Considers the creation and reception of celebrity texts: for example, around Harry Potter, and fanhood as a performative critique of celebrity. Examines relevant PR and media strategies.
Course Code and Credits: LIT 5405B (3)
Course Title: British Fantasy Writing: Magic Memory
Course Description:
This course explores the long-standing, unique and vibrant tradition of Fantasy literature in Britain. It will focus on the major fantasies from the past 120 years and their filmed adaptations, including works by Bram Stoker, J.R.R. Tolkien and J.K. Rowling. It will look at how these texts and their filmic counterparts revisit older ideas for novel purposes. Where possible, field trips to sites such as Strawberry Hill (first gothic home) or Harry Potter London tours will be arranged to supplement this course. Students should budget $50 for these field trips.

Psychology
Course Code and Credits: PSY 5215B (3)
Course Title: Personality, Individual Differences and Intelligence
Course Description:
The purpose of this course is to increase students’ awareness of the variety of theoretical viewpoints that exist regarding the nature of human individual differences and the factors that influence human behavior. We will examine the different theoretical viewpoints about intelligence, personality structure and its development, emotion, motivation, cognitive styles, the development of psychopathology, and clinical applications for personality change. Students will evaluate prominent theoretical perspectives critically and consider cultural variations in individual differences.

Session C (July 2 - July 21)

Art History and Art, Design and Media
Course Code and Credits: ADM 3160C (3)
Course Title: Foundations in Photography
Course Description:
This course concentrates on developing the student’s visual intelligence via photography. Technically, students will learn to use digital Single Lens Reflex cameras and Photoshop for image workflow and editing. By looking at the work of a range of artists, students will be introduced to some of the theories that underpin photographic practice and consider photography’s place and role in contemporary culture. Throughout the course students make images which finally result in an edited portfolio of photographic prints.
Course Code and Credits: AVC 5200C (3)
Course Title: Museums and Galleries of London: The Cultures of Display
Course Description:
Considers the nature of museums and art galleries and their role and function in our society. Studies the workings of the art market, conservation, restoration, the investment potential of art and art world crime. Students visit many of the great London collections as part of this course. Suitable for students majoring in Art History or for those interested in careers in museum or gallery work. Visits require some travel and entrance costs.

Business Administration and Economics
Course Code and Credits: MKT 5405C (3)
Course Title: Fashion, Marketing and Retail
Course Description:
This course covers the fundamentals of fashion and the basic principles that govern all fashion movement and change. It examines the history, development, organization and operation of merchandising and marketing activities, trends in industries engaged in producing fashion, purchasing of fashion merchandise, foreign and domestic markets, and the distribution and promotion of fashion.

Literature and Communications
Course Code and Credits: COM 5218C (3)
Course Title: Celebrity and Fan Culture
Course Description:
Charts the development and critical context of contemporary celebrity and fan cultures. Outlines key theoretical approaches. Explores the topic through a variety of media, from artists like Andy Warhol, Lady Gaga, Eminem, and Alison Jackson, to fanfic and other fan culture artifacts. Considers the creation and reception of celebrity texts: for example, around Harry Potter, and fan-hood as a performative critique of celebrity. Examines relevant PR and media strategies.
Course Code and Credits: CRW 5200C (3)
Course Title: Script Writing
Course Description:
Students are guided through the creative processes of writing scenes for the stage, T.V. and film. The building of character and plot is examined as well as the industry standard formats for writing in these media. Group and team work are encouraged as well as discussions, critique and analysis of the narrative techniques used in existing stage plays and films.

Music and Theater Arts
Course Code and Credits: THR 5405C (3)
Course Title: Shakespeare and His World
Course Description:
Aimed at the novice and the experienced reader of Shakespeare, this course provides a historical context to Shakespeare’s writing and closely analyzes the poetic and dramatic aspects in his drama. Shakespeare in performance is an integral part of the course and students are expected to see productions of most texts studied. A performance fee is levied on this course.

6-Week Courses (May 23 - June 30)

Art History and Art, Design and Media
Course Code and Credits: ADM 5210 (3)
Course Title: Pixel Playground
Course Description:
This course focuses on the study of image making – both digital and handmade. Through art and design briefs, students will study and explore color, composition, illustration and visual narratives. This course familiarizes students with two core visual applications: Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator.

Business Administration and Economics
Course Code and Credits: ACC 4205 (3)
Course Title: Managerial Accounting
Course Description:
This course introduces students to the generation of cost data for the preparation of proper, representative financial statements, and for optimal planning and control of routine operations and long range organizational goals. It focuses on the uses of formal cost accounting systems and quantitative techniques to make managerial decisions. Topics include: direct absorption income statements, job and process costing, allocation and proration, pro-forma and capital budgeting.
Course Code and Credits: ENT 4200 (3)
Course Title: Introduction to Entrepreneurship
Course Description:
This course provides an introduction to the concept and practice of entrepreneurship. It intends to provide the ‘big picture’ on entrepreneurship, but to also cover a number of key micro issues relating to the more numerous small businesses that make up the majority of all business activity in societies everywhere. The course readily acknowledges that there is no single theory or model of entrepreneurship; but this lack of a distinct theoretical spine provides the course with its strongest advantage as this provides for an opportunity to present a multiplicity of case work and concepts. The emphasis is on comparing the diversity of approaches found within the world of the entrepreneur.

Film and Theater
Course Code and Credits: FLM 5410 (3)
Course Title: Gender in Film
Course Description:
This course explores key concepts that have shaped the study of gender in film in the past 50 years. It considers different spectators’ viewing positions and analyzes how historical and social changes in the construction of masculinities and femininities have shaped specific film genres. A variety of issues related to sexuality, race/ethnicity and non-western representations are also considered as students are encouraged to study film texts closely to make their own readings based on the semiotics of the film and the ideology behind it.

History
Course Code and Credits: HST 3200 (3)
Course Title: World Cultural History II
Course Description:
This course is designed to study in broad outline the origins of global interdependence, from 1500-1800. The politics, religion, art and architecture of European, Islamic and East Asian cultures will be studied. In world terms, the period is most noteworthy for the impact of European expansionism, sustained by scientific invention and commercial acquisitiveness, underpinned by religion. While the class work focuses on the discussion of broad themes supported by close reading of relevant primary texts, students will practice presenting specific topics in group oral presentations. Class visits are scheduled to relevant exhibitions in London.

Mathematics
Course Code and Credits: MTH 4120 (3)
Course Title: Probability and Statistics I
Course Description:
An introductory course in probability primarily designed for business economics and psychology majors. The course coverage will include: descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory, random variables and expectations, discrete probability distributions (Binomial and Poisson distributions), continuous probability distribution (Normal distribution), linear regression analysis and correlations, elementary hypothesis testing and Chi-square tests, non-parametric methods and SPSS lab sessions targeting applications of statistical concepts to business, economics and psychology and interpretations of hardcopies. All practical work will be produced using SPSS statistical software.

Philosophy
Course Code and Credits: PHL 4100 (3)
Course Title: Introduction to Philosophy
Course Description:
This course introduces students to discipline of philosophy. It examines various branches of philosophy including logic, epistemology, ontology, ethics, political and religious philosophy. It takes a topic-based rather than historical approach, and looks at sets of problems such as the mind-body problem, empiricism versus rationalism, and subjectivism versus naturalism. To this end, various important Western philosophers will be considered including Aristotle, Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant and Russell.

Science
Course Code and Credits: GEP 3140 (3)
Course Title: Scientific Reasoning
Course Description:
What do you consider when you consider your carbon footprint? How do you evaluate the quality and conclusions of a double blind trial? This core course aims to provide a means by which the student can effectively communicate an understanding and appreciation of the impact of science on everyday life and academic enquiry. Scientific areas to be explored range from ethics to evolution, physics to physiology, climate change to conservation, and trials and testing to thinkers and innovators. This core course teaches students to reflect critically on information so that they may make informed personal decisions about matters that involve science and understand the importance of science in other areas of their studies.