AIFS Abroad

AIFS Study Abroad in Perth, Australia
Fall 2021 and Spring 2022
Course Descriptions

   

FULL CURRICULUM PROGRAM

Full Curriculum means that students can choose any course offered at Murdoch University subject to prerequisites. To follow is a list of popular courses previous AIFS students have taken; however, a wide range of courses is available each semester, many more than can be listed in this catalog. Visit Murdoch University’s website for a full list of courses available in your chosen semester.

Australian universities offer 3-year degrees in courses of specialized study. Students begin at the equivalent of the U.S. sophomore level with no introductory courses offered. For each course the number of recommended U.S. semester credits is shown in parentheses. Students can take up to 4 courses, however due to the heavy workload required, the university recommends that students take 3. Students wishing to take the Specialized Certificate Programs should contact the AIFS Admissions Officer for a list of courses in each study area.

JULY - NOVEMBER SEMESTER

AIS 110 Australian and Indigenous Studies (4)
Introduction into Indigenous Popular Culture
While acknowledging the importance of traditional forms of cultural expression such as dot paintings and traditional dance, this course aims to familiarize students with a broader range of Indigenous cultural products. Students will gain an appreciation of the highly varied and exciting ways in which understandings of Indigenous cultures and identities are articulated.

ART 101 Education and Humanities (8)
Coming into Community
Modern jobs need you to be skilled in working with people, whether in the commercial world, employed by government, doing things with community groups or taking care of the future of the globe. This unit gives you a chance to combine learning how to do well at university with the art of moving in and out of new communities and different workplaces. It asks people to look at different knowledge traditions (including Noongar) both on and off campus.

ART 102 Art and Humanities (8)
Inventing the Future
What might the future bring? How does it relate to the past? How might it be different from the present? Arts disciplines form the primary means by which humans ask questions of and understand their worlds. This unit explores how contending visions of the future shape the world we live in today and how our own visions might shape our world tomorrow. By examining such visions, you will develop your capacity for critical thinking, coherent writing, and sharing your ideas with others.

BIO 247 Biological Sciences and Biotechnology (4)
Biochemistry
How do organisms generate energy? How do they make the building blocks for new cells? These questions are at the heart of biochemistry and will be explored in this unit across a wide range of organisms. The basic structure of cells and the mechanisms by which they function will be examined, followed by a detailed study of the key pathways of energy generation and biosynthesis. The laboratory components will also develop core skills in biochemical analysis.

BIO 257 Biological Sciences and Biotechnology (4)
Australian Biodiversity
With a focus on the unique flora and fauna of Australia, this unit will introduce you
to phylogenetic relationships and classification, adaptations, ecological and cultural significance, and the threats to biological diversity.

CHI 100 Health Sciences (4)
Food, Nutrition and Health
Nutrition is one of the major determinants of health and well-being in our society. This unit is for those who are interested in improving their knowledge of food, nutrition and health. Students will gain a broad understanding of nutrition science including applicable skills such as analyzing what they eat and planning a healthy diet. Topics will explore what we eat (food and diet), nutrients, energy balance, weight management and the scientific evaluation of nutrition messages and information in the media.

CMS 102 Communication and Media Studies (4)
Contemporary Culture
Examines the relationship between power, identity and the role of the media in the production and dissemination of culture. We consider how culture and knowledge are produced, communicated, mediated and how they construct ‘selfhood’.
You will have opportunities to think critically about these issues via mixed modes of assessment.

COD 201 Community Development (4)
Stories of Doing Community Work
Provides an understanding and appreciation of the diverse settings and areas of practice within community development in contemporary Australia. In addition, students will learn skills to help with the preparation of funding applications.

COM 101 Communications (4)
Social Media
This unit introduces social media and their application in communication management, web communications and public relations. Students learn about social media and websites as platforms for engaging users and their role in media relations and other communication activity. Students develop skills in online writing for a variety of audiences and in campaign planning, incorporating social media platforms such as, for example, blogs, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Students also learn about the theoretical implications of the network society and online communications.

CRM 100 Criminology (4)
Introduction to Criminology
Provides an overview and introduction to the study of criminology from a multi-disciplinary perspective including the history of punishment, current solutions to crime and victim impact.

EGL 106 English (4)
Drama, Theater and Performance
Introduces students to a selection of dramatic texts from a range of different periods and cultures and assists them in developing skills in the analysis and critique of these dramatic texts. In workshops students will learn basic skills in voice, movement and improvisation and will have an opportunity to participate in transforming a text into a performance.

EGL 230 English (4)
Popular Literature and Science Fiction
Combines analysis of popular literature’s cultural impact with close readings of texts from several genres, emphasizing so-called speculative, or science fiction. We investigate the origins of various generic elements of popular fiction, developing an understanding of their historical and social basis, and their political potential.

ENV 241 Environmental Sciences (4)
Ecology
Ecology concerns interactions of biota that determine their distribution and abundance. Students study ecological concepts, the scientific method, and their practical application in the field. Theory will cover interactions from the level of individuals, through populations, communities, ecosystems and finally, the biosphere. The unit is taught from an evolutionary perspective and will use familiar Australian examples to augment understanding. A field component is integral: all students participate in the collection and interpretation of a substantial set of ecological field data.

ENV 245 Environmental Sciences (4)
Global and Regional Sustainability
Enables students to apply their understanding of sustainability and their knowledge of environmental systems to different scales ranging from regional to global. Students will develop competence to unpack the threats to sustainability and their underlying drivers. They will explore strategies to address them which incorporate technical, governance, economic and social approaches.

EXS 102 Exercise Science (4)
Human Physiology
Students will learn about human physiology through the examination of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, digestive, excretive and immune systems.

EXS 103 Exercise Science (4)
Strength and Resistance Training
Focuses on current scientific principles of strength and resistance training primarily in the healthy population. While the role of ageing and gender will be discussed, a large portion of the unit will focus on the strength and resistance training aspects associated with athletes and otherwise healthy individuals. The student will then be able to apply these principles to other individuals adopting sedentary behaviors and living with lifestyle-related disease such as cardiovascular disease, obesity and diabetes.

EXS 390 Exercise Science (4)
Exercise Science Practicum
Designed to provide study abroad students with practical field experience in the area of Exercise Science. The practical skills gained in EXS 390 are essential to increasing one’s understanding of the need for exercise programs in a healthy population. From this practical placement, students should begin to recognize the skills that are necessary to develop and implement exercise programs in healthy individuals. Additionally, students will be provided the opportunity to extend classroom theory to the field.

GAD 154 Games Art and Design (4)
Introduction to Games Art and Design
Provides students with basic knowledge in concept art, game engine evaluation, game play, storyboarding, and basic workflow standards. Students are also introduced to games as a wider cultural and philosophical phenomenon.

HIS 302 History (4)
Vision Splendid: An Alternative History of Australia
Takes historical themes that have shaped traditional narratives of the nation - colonization, gold rush, federation, world wars, post-war boom, and new nationalism - and provides different perspectives on them. Students will consider alternative topics that extend our understanding of the making of modern Australia, including Aboriginal outlaw heroes, prostitution and the gold rushes, plague and federation, organized crime in the inter-war years, and Australia’s support for Indonesia’s independence post-WWII.

JOU 340 Journalism (4)
Journalism and Society
Considers the relationship, roles and functions of the journalist in modern society. Students will investigate a range of issues which highlight the political and cultural significance of journalism in society, its application in the multi-platform media age and its practice in a range of subset disciplines, such as war reporting, business journalism, and its interaction with public relations.

PHL 206 Philosophy (4)
Moral and Political Philosophy
Enormous economic and social change, exponential advancement in technology, unprecedented freedom of choice amid increasing inequalities create pressing concerns about how to make the most of our own lives and how we can best live together with other people, locally and globally. This unit explores philosophical responses to these issues in light of different understandings of ethical and political values, the good life, justice and virtue.

PHO 101 Photography (4)
Digital Imaging
The emphasis is on the integration of digital technologies into photographic practices and introduces students to the practice and methods of production of photographers who utilize a variety of digital technologies in their work.

PHO 124 Photography (4)
Photography I
This unit is an introduction to the theory and practice of photography. The course will equip students to develop the conceptual and technical skills required to produce substantial photography projects. Students will develop a proposed area of project development at the beginning of the course to develop into a portfolio project by the end of semester. In addition students will be introduced to the history, the key theoretical debates, photographic movements and practitioners of photography.

POL 226 Politics and International Studies (4)
Sex and Gender Matters
Theoretical perspectives on sex and gender are examined through topics including: gender and nature; science of gender difference; masculinities; divisions of paid and unpaid work; politics of sexuality; gender and security; and gender and development. Students are encouraged to reflect on their own gendered positions and to link the personal and familiar with the political and structural.

POL 390 Political and International Studies (4)
Public Policy Internship
Students will undertake research under the collective guidance of a Member of Parliament (MP)/public sector representative and a Murdoch University academic supervisor. Assessment is a combination of participation in the placement, a research project and a presentation.

PSY 144 Psychology (4)
Introduction to Psychological Science
Psychological science seeks to understand the realms of human behavior, emotion and thought using scientific methods that allow us to pose and answer the questions about ourselves and our societies. Do IQ tests really measure intelligence? What causes schizophrenia? Why are some people intolerant of others? This course provides an introduction to the subject and is open to students from any discipline.

PSY 172 Psychology (4)
Introduction to Psychological Health and Wellbeing
Psychology has an important role in designing systems that make people happy, healthy and productive. This course will critically examine the concepts of health, wellbeing and happiness and demonstrate how to add quality to peoples’ lives.

PSY 297 Psychology (4)
Psychology: Sensation and Perception
This unit explores how humans experience the world around them through the senses of vision, audition, balance, smell, and taste, namely how biological (sensory) inputs are used in the psychological process of perception. Students will examine the physiological and psychological foundations of sensation and perception.

PSY 388 Psychology (4)
Psychology: Abnormal Behavior
This unit will introduce how abnormal behavior is defined, and will explore the symptoms, causes and treatment of common and less common psychological disorders. These disorders and their treatment will be conceptualized through various theoretical frameworks, including cognitive, behavioral, systemic and neuropsychological approaches. Current issues relevant to both clinical practice and research will also be explored.

PSY 392 Psychology (4)
Psychology: Family Relations and Social Development
Relationships play a key role in development. From a family life cycle perspective, this unit examines how individuals manage developmental tasks within dynamic and evolving social contexts.

RAD 374 Radio (4)
Popular Music
Students will study the major streams of Western popular music such as folk, country, blues, jazz, rock and roll, and hip hop, to discover the many ways in which these styles have influenced each other and the mainstream. The interweaving of popular music and its surrounding society and popular culture, the way the music business acts on and reacts to musical trends, technology’s effect on popular music, and the evolution of the musical artist as a branded product, will be explored.

REL 202 Religion (4)
Faith, Conflict and Human Rights
Explores the wide variety of approaches to the study of religion. Specific symbols, rituals, and scriptures from a variety of world religions will be examined to demonstrate the usefulness of different theoretical approaches. These approaches will include: sociology, anthropology, psychology, historical inquiry, and phenomenology.

REL 205 Religion (4)
Mysteries, Magic and Myths
This unit explores the various ways ancient Greeks and Romans interacted with the divine, including magic, gnostic speculation, mystery religions, visionary journeys, oracles, and more. We will study not only these religious phenomena, but also the ancients’ own critical reflections on what they were doing.

SUS 100 Global Studies (4)
Introduction to Sustainable Development
This unit is a critical introduction to sustainability that traces the concept’s evolution and explores the political economy of sustainability. To this end, a range of different approaches to sustainability are introduced and compared, and analysis will be made of their respective effectiveness in addressing global sustainability problems.

TOU 102 Travel and Tourism (4)
Travel and Tourism in Society
Students will “experience” the world of travel and tourism through the writings of travelers, through the work of social researchers and through their own travel experiences. The main concern in this unit will be the human dimension of tourism, the motivation to travel, the experience of travel and impacts on host communities. At least one field trip will be an important activity during the semester.

FEBRUARY - JUNE SEMESTER

AIS 180 Australian and Indigenous Studies (4)
Introduction to Australian Indigenous Studies
This unit introduces students to the discipline of Indigenous Studies and explores
the importance of positioning yourself as a student of Indigenous Studies and the concept of negotiating speaking positions when working with Indigenous people and knowledges. Finally, the unit considers current debates and their impact on the discipline’s future, thus preparing students for further Indigenous Studies.

AIS 206 Australian and Indigenous Studies (4)
Country, Nature and Identity: Indigenous Sustainability
Explores the intersections between sustainability, indigenous community aspirations and cultural-natural resources, and our collective responsibility to better understand and manage Australian landscapes and communities.

ART 101 Education and Humanities (8)
Coming into Community
Modern jobs need you to be skilled in working with people, whether in the commercial world, employed by government, doing things with community groups or taking care of the future of the globe. This unit gives you a chance to combine learning how to do well at university with the art of moving in and out of new communities and different workplaces. It asks people to look at different knowledge traditions (including Noongar) both on and off campus.

ART 102 Art and Humanities (8)
Inventing the Future
What might the future bring? How does it relate to the past? How might it be different from the present? Arts disciplines form the primary means by which humans ask questions of and understand their worlds. This unit explores how contending visions of the future shape the world we live in today and how our own visions might shape our world tomorrow. By examining such visions, you will develop your capacity for critical thinking, coherent writing, and sharing your ideas with others.

BEN 150 Engineering (4)
Design Concepts in Engineering
Topics covered include engineering design, sustainability, climate change, ethics, social justice and engineers’ engagement with the community. The material will be delivered using historical episodes to illustrate concepts such as response to needs, learning from the mistakes of others, unintended consequences, and the relative merits of soft and hard path technologies. Case studies will be used to illustrate current practices by organizations that address the need to engage local communities in large scale engineering projects.

BIO 103 Biological Sciences and Biotechnology (4)
Environmental Biology
Students will develop specialist knowledge in marine biology and skills in the identification of marine organisms and the conduct of marine research. The main topics covered are: (i) the marine environment; (ii) the types and variety of marine organisms; and (iii) major ecological categories of marine organisms. 

BIO 180 Biological Sciences and Biotechnology (4)
Introduction to Marine Biology
Students will develop specialist knowledge in marine biology and skills in the identification of marine organisms and the conduct of marine research. The main topics covered are: (i) the marine environment; (ii) the types and variety of marine organisms; and (iii) major ecological categories of marine organisms.

For students interested in marine biology, AIFS offers a 3-week summer program with Murdoch University which includes a 10-day field study trip to Coral Bay.

BMS 101 Biomechanics (4)
Introduction to the Human Body
This course is designed to introduce students to the living human body, beginning with learning about cells and tissue types and then the functional and gross anatomy of each of the major body systems. This course will also deal with the concepts of ageing and death.

CHE 103 Chemistry (4)
Introduction to Forensic Science
The scientific disciplines that may be applied to solving crime are introduced and explored using case studies and examples. Forensic science professionals present guest lectures to provide students with a “real world” perspective. Participation in online discussion groups is utilized to provide students with opportunities for active and cooperative learning.

CHI 100 Health Sciences (4)
Food, Nutrition and Health
Nutrition is one of the major determinants of health and well-being in our society. This unit is for those who are interested in improving their knowledge of food, nutrition and health. Students will gain a broad understanding of nutrition science including applicable skills such as analyzing what they eat and planning a healthy diet. Topics will explore what we eat (food and diet), nutrients, energy balance, weight management and the scientific evaluation of nutrition messages and information in the media.

CMS 304 Communication and Media Studies (4)
Communicating Global Issues
Provides students with interdisciplinary perspectives on globalization by addressing key socio-economic-cultural issues as identified by the United Nations including human trafficking, HIV/AIDS in developing and developed countries, the economic effects of transnational corporations, which foreground the connections between gender and cultural politics. Importantly, it provides an opportunity for students to broaden their understanding of these issues and communicate their own responses.

CRM 100 Criminology (4)
Introduction to Criminology
Provides an overview and introduction to the study of criminology from a multi-disciplinary perspective including the history of punishment, current solutions to crime and victim impact.

CRM 201 Criminology (4)
Policing and Crime Prevention
Students will study the three broad theoretical perspectives in crime prevention
(Policing, Situational, and Developmental) and then examine the difficulty faced by modern police forces in protecting the community.

EGL 235 English (4)
Australian Literature and Film
A wide variety of texts will be introduced—books, extracts from literary works or documents such as explorers’ notebooks, settlers’ letters and diaries. There will also be opportunities to study film versions of literary texts. The works selected will provide the basis for studying cultural change in Australia in terms of changing attitudes toEurope, Aboriginal history and national identity.

EGL 239 English (4)
Acting and Production
Provides students with basic acting and production skills. Students will perform in front of a small in-house audience to test these skills but the emphasis in the unit is on training. At the end of the unit, students will have learned some basic acting and production skills and will have gained experience in the performance of a dialogue and an audition monologue.

EGL 240 English (4)
Children’s Theater
The course aim is to develop an ensemble of skilled theater practitioners whose learning processes result in the public performance of an original script for an audience of children. A range of workshop opportunities are offered through which to develop skills, whether as actors, designers, stage-managers, set-builders, musicians or lighting and sound technicians.

ENV 278 Environmental Sciences (4)
Nature-Based Tourism
The importance of ecology for maintaining the natural environment on which nature-based tourism depends is overviewed. Planning frameworks for sustainable nature-based tourism, such as the Limits of Acceptable Change and the Tourism Optimization Management Model, are explored and applied. This exploration is linked to gaining an appreciation of the impacts of nature-based tourism and how these can be managed. This course will include field trips to Penguin Island and Shoalwater Marine Park.

EXS 124 Exercise Science (4)
Introduction to Sports Science
This unit has 2 main components: health and physical fitness assessment; sports medicine and covers topics including definition and components of sports science and physical fitness; resting and exercise vitals; body compositions; muscular fitness; medical terminology; neurological screening; joint assessment; preventing sports injuries; sports nutrition; drugs in sport; principles of injury management; common sporting illnesses and injuries; common medical conditions affecting athletes.

EXS 201 Exercise Science (4)
Sport and Exercise Psychology
Seeks to respond to a paradox of Western culture; the well-established benefits of regular exercise and the persistence of many to a sedentary lifestyle. This unit will introduce a key component of sport and exercise psychology: motivation. Students will learn how to apply key psychological principles to increase exercise participation and adherence. Additionally, students will explore motivation and performance in (elite) sport.

EXS 390 Exercise Science (4)
Exercise Science Practicum
Designed to provide study abroad students with practical field experience in the area of Exercise Science. The practical skills gained in EXS 390 are essential to increasing one’s understanding of the need for exercise programs in a healthy population. From this practical placement, students should begin to recognize the skills that are necessary to develop and implement exercise programs in healthy individuals. Additionally, students will be provided the opportunity to extend classroom theory to the field.

FSN 100 Food Science and Nutrition (4)
From Paddock to Plate
This unit will introduce students to the journey of food from the paddock to the plate. It will investigate how food is grown, modified, stored and prepared to ensure the enjoyment of food that is safe while ensuring that nutritional requirements are met. The unit will also address how food is prepared to meet the requirements of different areas of human endeavor and the influence of food trends and cultural norms.

GAD 241 Games Art and Design (4)
Animation
This unit provides students with a solid basis in the theory and practice of 3D animation. It covers the historical, theoretical and practical aspects of animation with an aim of arming students with all the knowledge and skills needed to start creating thoughtful and engaging 3D animated works.

PHO 124 Photography (4)
Photography I
This unit is an introduction to the theory and practice of photography. The course will equip students to develop the conceptual and technical skills required to produce substantial photography projects. Students will develop a proposed area of project development at the beginning of the course to develop into a portfolio project by the end of semester. In addition students will be introduced to the history, the key theoretical debates, photographic movements and practitioners of photography.

POL 192 Politics and International Studies (4)
Perspectives on Security and Terrorism
Introduces the concepts of security, risk, terrorism and counterterrorism and examines how various agents in international society perceive and employ them. The unit also analyzes the relationships between terrorism and religion, the media, democracy and international law. It finally examines the way Australia has responded to terrorist threats since the attacks on the U.S. in September 2001.

POL 234 Political and International Studies (4)
Terrorism in a Globalized World
Since the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001, the specter of terrorism and resultant ‘War on Terror’ have come to dominate and in many respects reshape national and international politics. The aim of this unit is to provide a critical understanding of terrorism and counter-terrorism politics and policy within the context of a globalized world. Drawing upon both contemporary and historical case studies, the unit considers the complex interrelationships between forces of globalization, political interest, ideology and violence.

POL 236 Politics and International Studies (4)
U.S. Policies and Global Security
The unit explores a range of American foreign policy actions and involvements from the Cold War to the post-Cold War era, including the Cuban missile crisis, arms control negotiations, alliance strategies, the “war on terror” and the U.S. relationship with global norms using the relationship between identity and security as a guiding theme.

PRO 285 Public Relations (4)
Public Relations in Society
Draws on recent scholarship and a socio-cultural approach to present alternative understandings to the functional and normative understandings of public relations, which historically have dominated the field. Rather than viewing public relations as an organizational or management function, this unit explores public relations as a cultural activity influenced by the social, political and cultural contexts and actively involved in the construction of meaning.

PSY 101 Psychology (4)
Introduction to Cultural Psychology
This course demonstrates the interdependent nature of human psychology and culture and how psychological processes and human behavior are influenced by culture, and how culture is influenced by individuals and groups.

PSY 144 Psychology (4)
Introduction to Psychological Science
Psychological science seeks to understand the realms of human behavior, emotion and thought using scientific methods that allow us to pose and answer the questions about ourselves and our societies. Do IQ tests really measure intelligence? What causes schizophrenia? Why are some people intolerant of others? This course provides an introduction to the subject and is open to students from any discipline.

PSY 251 Psychology (4)
Biological Bases of Behavior
This course introduces the biological foundation of behavior including the organization and function of the nervous system, the role of drugs and neurotransmitters in this system, the psychophysiology of motivational states such as sleep, temperature and eating, and the biology of learning, addiction and mood disorders.

PSY 286 Psychology (4)
Human Development
This course examines the lifespan development from conception to death. The developmental theories are presented, and the biosocial, cognitive and psychosocial influences on the individual are studied and integrated to understand the developing person.

PSY 393 Psychology (4)
The Developing Minds
Between birth and adulthood, dramatic changes take place in an individuals understanding of the world and in many of their cognitive skills and abilities. The course will examine these changes and the theories offered to explain them.

SOC 313 Sociology (4)
Health and Society
Emphasizes the social construction of knowledge about health, illness and healing, the significance of power relations, and the relationship between power and knowledge. Topics: illness experience and embodiment, inequalities in health, socio-cultural constructions of the “normal”, “healthy” body, sociological critiques of medical knowledge, especially post-structuralist and feminist critiques, the new genetics, health promotion and the new public health.

SUS 100 Global Studies (4)
Introduction to Sustainable Development
This unit is a critical introduction to sustainability that traces the concept’s evolution and explores the political economy of sustainability. To this end, a range of different approaches to sustainability are introduced and compared, and analysis will be made of their respective effectiveness in addressing global sustainability problems.

SUS 203 Global Studies (4)
Sustainability, Ecology and Communities
This unit develops knowledge of the conceptual, practical and policy aspects of sustainable development. The unit focuses on the implementation of sustainability at a local and sub-national level. Systems thinking and resilience are presented as key tools to both understand sustainability problems and develop sustainability solutions within social-ecological systems. The implementation of sustainability is then explored through a range of governance, business and civil society approaches.

TOU 232 Tourism (4)
Festivals and Events
Aims to give an understanding of the complexities of Event Studies. It examines the application of theoretical frameworks from the field and also gives experience in the planning and analysis of various event types. Events ranging from the community level to the global are used as case studies and students are also expected to design their own community event as part of the assessment process.

VET 380 Veterinary Science (4)
Veterinary Nutrition and Toxicology
Nutritional management is core to the maintenance of health, welfare, production and disease management in domestic animals. This unit will provide students with an opportunity to learn about the fundamentals of nutrients, animal feeds, nutritional biochemistry of vitamins and minerals, interactions between nutrients and feed components, ration formulation and evaluation, practical feeding strategies for livestock and companion animals and nutrition-responsive diseases of domestic animals. Also provides an introduction to toxicology of animals.

BREADTH UNITS SUBJECTS

Murdoch University also offers a series of courses which come under the heading “Breadth Units” and do not belong to a particular academic discipline. These units form part of the undergraduate degree curriculum across all majors and are open to AIFS students. The idea behind them is to introduce students to knowledge outside their chosen discipline, but more importantly they teach the student to understand how to think and solve problems. The courses change but the following is a sample of what has been offered in the past.

BRD 201 (4)
Food Matters
With an overarching global perspective, this unit will explore food production and consumption in the context of history, economics, sociology, ethics, science and technology, and how each of these disciplines influence food attitudes and practices.

BRD 202 (4)
Drugs in Society
This unit explores drugs, asking how they are discovered and regulated. It examines social drugs such as alcohol and nicotine, illicit drugs such as cannabis and cocaine, and medicines such as painkillers and anti-depressants. It considers social, ethical and economic issues such as reproductive medicines, drugs in sport and the rise of complementary medicines, as well as future personalized therapies.

BRD 203 (4)
Carbon and Climate: A Wicked Problem
This unit describes the nature of the problem with carbon use, which needs to
be tackled broadly because there are no simple solutions. Scientific/technical opportunities and limitations are explored together with their economic, legal
and social implications, to develop a deeper understanding of the current political controversy.

BRD 205 (4)
Crime through the Ages
Students learn that explanations of crime are dependent on many factors, including some entirely independent of crime. It is an interpersonal, social, political, economic and philosophical issue. Crime and history are the underlay through which students learn the interaction of different perspectives and begin to understand those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat the mistakes of the past.

BRD 209 (4)
Creativity and Innovation
Students will learn the benefits of adopting and applying diverse perspectives and problem-solving tools, especially within interdisciplinary teams, to find better ideas and products. Examples of creative and innovative thinking will be taken from a broad spectrum of disciplines, including science, engineering, the environment, media, ethics, business and indigenous culture.

BRD 210 (4)
World of Sport
Drawing on perspectives from psychology, exercise science, pharmacology, sociology, media, ethics and business this unit requires students to consider current themes in sport including the limits of high-performance sport, sport for mental and physical health, and sport and Australian culture. Students are encouraged to think critically and analyze a wide range of information and perspectives to better understand why sport has become an important facet of modern life.

BRD 251 (4)
Wellbeing
Explores physiological, creative, psychological, historical, philosophical, environmental, emotional and economic perspectives of wellbeing. Integration of these perspectives will assist the student to articulate personal understandings of wellbeing and better apply the concept to their own lives.

BRD 306 (4)
Transitions to Post Carbon Society
This unit presents a range of discipline perspectives on how cities and regions
may function after the Age of Oil. How will different parts of the world look without dependency on fossil fuels as the primary energy source? Post carbon societies will be varied and disciplinary perspectives blurred. Students will engage with the political economy of cultural and institutional challenges of transition, use creative problem-solving techniques to develop scenarios for different societies and compare different technologies in various industry sectors.

BREADTH UNITS SUBJECTS

In addition to the courses in this catalog, courses are available in the following disciplines:

Animal Science
Biological Sciences
Biomedical Science
Chiropractic and Sports Science
Climate Change Management
Community Development
Computer Science
Conservation and Wildlife Biology
Criminology
Cyber Forensics
Education (Primary and Secondary)
Engineering (Electrical, Environmental and Technology)
English and Creative Writing
Events Management
Exercise Physiology
Forensic Biology and Toxicology
Games Art and Design (Games Technology)
Hospitality and Tourism Management
Information Technology
Journalism
Law and Legal Studies
Marine Science
Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Media and Mass Communication
Nursing
Politics and International Studies
Physics and Nanotechnology
Psychology
Public Relations
Radio, Film and Television
Renewable Energy
Security and Counterterrorism
Social Sciences and Humanities
Sustainability
Theater and Drama
Theology
Veterinary Science

For course descriptions, visit Murdoch University's website.

Courses are subject to change at the discretion of the University of Murdoch.